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Million-dollar Lawsuit Rips Winstead Advice in NCPA Sex Scandal

In recent months, the National Center for Policy Analysis has worked hard to put a sex scandal involving its founder behind it. The free-market think tank fired the founder, John C. Goodman, hired a new leader (tea party star Allen B. West), and scheduled several high-profile speakers for its events. Now, however, the Dallas-based NCPA has filed a lawsuit against a prominent law firm and the firm’s chairman emeritus that revisits the sex scandal in detail. Among other things, the suit asserts that l’affaire Goodman caused the nonprofit organization to lose at least $2 million in fundraising—and nearly put it out of business.

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What That Trinity Toll Road Meeting Was Really About

This morning, Mayor Mike Rawlings called a meeting at Babb Bros BBQ, in Trinity Groves, to make an announcement. It was a strange event. I’m still trying to figure out what really just happened.

Outside, three people dressed as turkeys handed out anti-toll-road flyers. They read, in part: “There’s no question that the Trinity toll road is the single biggest turkey in Dallas. That’s why we’re so excited about Mayor Rawlings’ steadfast support of it. With former proponents jumping ship left and right, it’s getting harder to find advocates for such an expensive, unnecessary, and counterproductive initiative. Thank you for standing up for REAL turkeys like the toll road, Mayor Rawlings!”

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Ask John Neely Bryan: How the Yankees Conquered Dallas

I am truly humbled — (Ed.: You mean “honored” (I damn well know what I mean — JNB)) — to see the response elicited by my first foray into the dispensing of well-earned opinions, advisories, and judgments onto the World Wide Web. Most of you magnificently performed your duty of piling missives into the inbox at ask@dmagazine.com, and I shall endeavor to address your queries with all the timeliness of a bow-legged bobcat returning to its native soil during the first moon after the spring equinox to suffer the slow death it deserves for being such an abomination before God.

Some of you, I’m sorry to say, didn’t take my invitation seriously enough. “Boxers or briefs?” What sort of community icon, such that I am, would dare degrade himself by answering such impertinence? And what man in full possession of his faculties wears anything other than boxer-briefs these days?

Onward to more significant inquiries.

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Leading Off (11/19/14)

TCU Out of College Football Playoff: At least according to the committee’s projections Tuesday night. Alabama hornfrogged the Leaped Frogs, and shot up from #5 to #1. Baylor fans are off somewhere, crying into their RGIII sympathy casts. Not even the cool poster to the left could save the two schools.

Arrest Made in Murder of Teen Cancer Patient: First of all, bravo WFAA. There’s no way someone’s going to see that headline and [CLICK]. Secondly, the story is incredibly sad. Police are still looking for additional suspects, but Tyler Wiley, 19, has been charged with capital murder.

Six Flags Settles Roller Coaster Death Case: The terms of the settlement weren’t disclosed, but hopefully they included something along the lines of “STOP LETTING PEOPLE FALL OFF ROLLER COASTERS.” And money. Lots of money.

Texas OKs Prison Weddings: Kicker from this AP story: “Clark said word this week of mass murderer Charles Manson’s planned marriage in California was coincidental to the Texas agency’s plans.” So much prison wedding news!

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SOPS Presents Draft of a Charter to Home Rule Commission

Last night, Support Our Public Schools, the organization that began this home rule movement early this year, presented its proposed charter to the Home Rule Commission. It contains several things I’ve been talking about on Learning Curve, including moving trustee elections to November, adding a student trustee, and starting the school year earlier. I’ll have a dissection of it on Learning Curve in the next few days, but here it is for your perusal.

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Deep-Pocketed Black Rhino Killer May Not Get to Kill Endangered Rhino After All

You remember this story, right? The one that inspired a Colbert Word segment? The one about the guy who laid out a cool $350K at a Dallas Safari Club auction for a rare opportunity to shoot an endangered black Rhino and haul it back to the United States, stuff it, stick it somewhere in their home, and then brag to his friends about what a massive, Hemingway-esque trigger finger he has? That guy.

Well, that guy was Corey Knowlton, a international hunting consultant whose resume boasts of a Super Slam of wild sheep and the big five in Africa. And while, thanks to his success at the Dallas Safari Club auction, Mr. Knowlton does possess a permit to shoot and kill an endangered black rhinoceros, his little hunting expedition may not go off as planned after all. That’s because he needs another permit to haul the massive rhino carcass back to the United States.

Last spring, he applied for a permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that would enable him to import the rhino’s body following the hunt in Namibia. But he’s still waiting to hear back.

The agency is applying extra scrutiny to Knowlton’s request because of the rise in poaching, said spokesman Gavin Shire.

If the permit is denied, the safari club plans to refund Knowlton’s money that was pledged to a rhino conservation fund in the southwestern African country.

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Anchia Announces Town Hall Meeting on Tollway

In the release announcing this, State Rep. Rafael Anchia says 93 percent of respondents to his poll were against the tollway. We’re aghast. The release is below, the release with pictures and sample quotes from respondents is here:

(Update note: I’ve been gone, so catching up on a lot, including that the town hall debate is not a surprise, as I learned from this Unfair Park post.)

(Dallas, TX) State Representative Rafael Anchia will host a town hall meeting on the Trinity Tollroad Project on Wednesday, December 3, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Chris Semos campus of Rosemont Elementary School. The town hall meeting is open to the public and does not require a pre-registration.

The town hall will feature a panel of supporters, as well as representation from the opposition. Among the panelists are Michael Morris from NCTCOG and Councilman Scott Griggs from the City of Dallas, District 1. Additional panelists will be announced prior to the meeting.

Mr. Anchia represents Texas House District 103, in which a large portion of the Trinity Tollroad would lie. “In talking with constituents about the Trinity Tollroad Project, I was hearing a constant message of dissatisfaction with the proposed road. I conducted a survey to gauge the climate in and around Dallas, and the respondents were startlingly opposed to the project,” Representative Anchia said. The results of the online survey, along with a sample of public comments, are attached for review.

In the interest of efficiency, the public is encouraged to submit questions for the panel in advance by email to info@rafaelanchia.com.

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City Lab Also Thinks Dallas Needs to Double Down on Better Bus Service

City Lab writer Eric Jaffe weighs in on the proposed high speed rail line to downtown Dallas and how a sudden influx of passengers may strain DART’s existing public transit capacity. If you’ve been following along with recent developments, there’s not too much new here, but it offers a nice sumation of where we stand. And Jaffe also agrees that the best way to deal with improving public transit in Dallas may be rethinking our bus system:

From the sound of it, Dallas could use a bus makeover similar to the one recently proposed for its high-speed rail partner, Houston. That plan would increase the frequency and reliability of buses for no new operating costs, with ridership coverage taking only a slight hit. The idea of running bus-rapid transit in dedicated lanes over long Texas corridors, rather than hyper-local, high-cost streetcars, could also boost the commuter experience.

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Poll: The Greatest D Magazine Story in the History of Ever

By now you’ve had a chance, obviously, to read all 40 of the greatest stories ever published in the pages of D Magazine. In honor of our 40th anniversary, we revealed them over the course of 39 weeks between February and November. Now it’s time for a little scoreboarding.

Four writers landed two bylines apiece on the list: David Bauer (“The Sexiest Woman in Dallas” and “Akin vs. Dahl”), John Bloom (“Ole Anthony and the God Thing” and “Misty Crest: On the Frontier of the New American Dream”), Mike Shropshire (“Clayton Williams: Texas Crude” and “How Willie Nelson Saved Carl’s Corner — Again”), and Zac Crain (“Charley Pride Turns 70 and — Galdurnit — He’s Still Got Something” and “Love and Loss in a Small Texas Town.”)

One scribe boasts three — or two-and-a-half, depending on how you look at it. That’s Skip Hollandsworth (“Max Goldblatt’s Last Hurrah,” “The Fall of the House of Von Erich,” and “The Black Widow.”)

So one of those gents has got to be the greatest writer in the history of our humble publication, but we’re not here to debate that. We’re here to ask you to vote on the single-greatest story ever in D. The nominees are listed below. Write-ins accepted in the comments.

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Leading Off (11/18/14)

Dallas Woman Wins $202 Million Powerball Jackpot. Marilyn Boldon, give me a call. I have an idea. You’ll love it.

Big German! He was seen last night when he scored his 27,000th NBA point. The only other players to do that with a single franchise? Karl Malone, Kobe Bryant, and Michael Jordan. None of those guys is German, though.

Kidd’s Kids Going Strong. Kidd died far too young. But his legacy lives on. This year, 61 sick kids will get an experience they never would have had without Kidd’s work.

Tom Joyner No Longer on Dallas Airwaves. Yesterday, we mentioned the two radio stations that switched formats over the weekend. So did the Observer. You know what neither of us realized? With the format switch at 94.5, Tom Joyner lost his Dallas station.

Did Ken Paxton Swipe a $1,000 Pen? The incident happened a year ago at a Collin County courthouse. A spokesman for the new attorney general said it was a simple mistake. Maybe so. Christy Hoppe’s story strikes the right tone.

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How Should Gainesville Memorialize Killing 42 Men?

The Texas Observer has a piece about the recent unveiling of a memorial in Gainesville — in Cooke County, on Interstate 35, just south of the Red River — to the deaths of 42 men killed by the town for alleged treasonous activities in the midst of the Civil War. What duty does the city have to recognize this horrific act of mob violence?

The Medal of Honor program helped Gainesville get nominated—and then win—Rand McNally’s 2012 competition for “Most Patriotic Small Town in America,” a designation the town’s mayor, Jim Goldsworthy, loves to mention.

Around the time the town won the Rand McNally award, the Morton Museum of Cooke County leased a billboard to advertise a 150th anniversary: “October’s Reign of Terror, Commemorating the Great Hanging of 1862.” Within days, the city’s mayor pro tem, Ray Nichols, had voiced his disapproval. “Gainesville was voted most patriotic city in America this year, and we are very excited about it and our Medal of Honor Host City program. I think those are important. That other thing? I don’t think that’s important to anybody,” Nichols told the Austin American-Statesman at the time.

Though no explicit demands were made, the Cooke County Heritage Society pulled its sponsorship of the anniversary event, according to former Heritage Society President Steve Gordon, for fear that city officials’ anger might mean funding cuts to the town’s history museum. Gordon, an Oklahoma native and engineer who retired to Gainesville, was livid. “This story’s got to come up,” he says. “A lot of these people’s [families] weren’t even here in 1862. Why are they so upset?”

“These are good people,” McCaslin says. “They want their town to look good. You want to live in a town you’re proud of. That’s not a bad thing. Where does the Great Hanging fit into that? The town killed 42 people. It’s kind of a clunker.”

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