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Leading Off (3/7/14)

Dallas to Launch Bike Sharing Experiment. The city’s Park and Recreation Board approved the idea of contributing $125,000 to start a program with 15-20 rental bicycles at two locations in Fair Park this summer. The measure still needs the approval of the Landmark Commission and the City Council. Proponents hope that, if successful, it’ll serve as a model to gain support for a citywide effort. The program will be shut down during the State Fair — you know, the one time of year most people actually visit Fair Park.

Police Lieutenant Caught Sleeping, Impaired on Duty. A fellow officer snapped a picture of Lt. Mike Magiera asleep while at work, and WFAA has video of him failing a sobriety test. Magiera says he was just napping during an unpaid break, and that he was on pain pills due to severe pain following an accident. Investigators are determining what discipline Magiera should face.

Dallas Stars to Retire Mike Modano’s Number Saturday. The highest-scoring American player in NHL history will be honored at the American Airlines Center before tomorrow night’s game against the Minnesota Wild. I’m sure I speak for all extremely casual bandwagon hockey fans when I say thanks, Mike, for icing all those memorable power plays. No one hat-tricked across the blue line better, or did a more professional job of keeping his nose out of the crease.

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9 comments on “Leading Off (3/7/14)

  1. There’s a lot more to the story about Lt. Magiera. This is the guy who was/is? married to Stormy Magiera, the former DPD officer who was indicted a couple years back on nine felony counts and terminated from DPD. She had also been arrested in connection with a domestic disturbance with Lt. Magiera.

    If you read the story, you will note that he was evidently assigned to the auto pound and out of uniform. At the risk of stating the obvious, putting a seasoned officer who costs the city over $100,000 per year behind a desk at the auto pound is hardly “smart policing.”

    It would be interesting to know why a guy who costs the City well over $100,000 per year in salary & benefits was assigned to work there in the first place and what duties, exactly, he was assigned to perform.

  2. Bike sharing. How timely.

    http://poststar.com/news/state-and-regional/conn-man-files-lawsuit-against-citi-bike/article_4e155a18-7a1d-5cde-93ed-1d535bb812ba.html

    “A Connecticut man who says he was injured on New York City’s Citi Bike has filed a $15 million lawsuit against the bike-share operator. … His attorney says the 73-year-old now suffers from traumatic nerve palsy that left him unable to smell or taste.”

    Don’t tell Patrick or the rest of the hydra.

  3. If Dallas follows the NYC model, then the operator (a private company) assumes all liability. The city or Fair Park wouldn’t be on the hook for anything if something similar happens.

  4. Someone please explain why the bikes cost that much, and why they’re using such costly bikes?

  5. If it’s anything like other city bike shares, costs include: bikes (about $300 apiece, IIRC), maintenance, high-tech bike racks, customer support during hours when bikes are available, bike dispersal (that is, make sure no single rack runs out or fills up), and stuff like insurance, advertising, etc.

  6. By that logic, then you also suggest not driving, eating at restaurants, buying anything or breathing.

  7. I doubt that “casual” riders, to whom this program is probably geared, will want to bike in Dec, Jan, Feb, and most of Mar, Jun, Jul, Aug or most of Sept; then it’s shut down thru most of Oct, leaving a MILD Nov to complete a full four months of ideal riding.

    All of the other cities that have bike programs use private vendors…there’s a reason private folks aren’t interested. But then again, Dallas is a Can Do city trying too hard to be like everybody else and not carve its on identity. I’d like to see more effort to build a downtown canal. Then we can all share the USS Dallas.