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Health Insurance Rates For Obamacare’s Texas Marketplace Are Lower Than Expected

Bradford Pearson has many more details over on D Healthcare Daily, but here’s the gist about the numbers, which were released by the Department of Health and Human Services last night:

The HHS report found that the average premium nationally for the second lowest cost silver plan will be $328 before tax credits, or 16 percent below projections based off of Congressional Budget Office estimates. About 95 percent of uninsured people eligible for the Marketplace live in a state where their average premium is lower than projections.

A 27-year old living in Dallas who makes $25,000 per year will pay $74 per month for the lowest cost bronze plan and $139 per month for the lowest cost silver plan, taking into account tax credits.  And he or she will be able to choose from among 43 qualified health plans. For a family of four in Dallas with an income of $50,000 per year, the lowest bronze plan would cost only $26 per month, taking into account tax credits.

All of this information was released as Cruz stood on the Senate floor, arguing that healthcare premiums were expected to rise, and that the Affordable Care Act would kill the working class.

“You could not design a law to do more damage to young people than Obamacare if you sat down and tried,” he said at one point, echoing sentiments he expressed during a “Defund Obamacare” rally in Dallas last month.

And if you somehow still don’t know what this Affordable Care Act thing is that everybody’s been shouting about lately, or what it means for you, see the new issue of D Magazine.

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12 comments on “Health Insurance Rates For Obamacare’s Texas Marketplace Are Lower Than Expected

  1. I notice that those are averages. The WSJ puts forth this information
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303983904579095731139251304.html?mod=djemalertNEWS#project%3DEXCHANGES0924%26articleTabs%3Dinteractive
    and from that same page
    “Sources: Department of Health and Human Services (premiums on exchanges), eHealthinsurance.com (current Columbus, Ohio, premium), HealthCare.gov (all other current premiums)
    Notes: Premiums available on the health-insurance exchanges are for the lowest-priced bronze-level plan in 2014. Current lowest rates are for a nonsmoker, for coverage to begin Oct. 1, 2013, and may cover more limited benefits. Rates in Delaware, New Hampshire and New Jersey are applicable anywhere in the state.”

  2. The Obamacare Gold, Silver and Bronze medals go to whoever put this nonsense out there expecting people to believe it. The “cost” of the bronze plan for a family of 4 is $26 per month but for a single 27 year old it is $74 per month!! Seriously – who do you think is going to pick up the tab for the real cost?

  3. Eric- Off the bat, I’m not a j-school graduate. And I don’t think the Forbes writer is either.

    Secondly, that piece was written by a former Mitt Romney advisor, using an analysis by a libertarian think tank (where he serves as a senior fellow). Are the HHS numbers 100 percent accurate? I don’t know. Are the Manhattan Institute numbers accurate? I don’t know.

    So much of this is going to very case-by-case, depending on location, age, family size, plan-choice, etc. Everything at this point is just guesswork.

  4. Eric- Off the bat, I’m not a j-school graduate. And I don’t think the Forbes writer is either.

    Secondly, that piece was written by a former Mitt Romney advisor, using an analysis by a libertarian think tank (where he serves as a senior fellow). Are the HHS numbers 100 percent accurate? I don’t know. Are the Manhattan Institute numbers accurate? I don’t know.

    So much of this is going to vary case-by-case, depending on location, age, family size, plan-choice, etc. Everything at this point is just guesswork.

  5. We’re not going to know the pricing as it applies to each individual situation until the actual plans are publicized on October 1, especially given that the Texas state government has stuck it’s head in the sand. For me, personally, given that I now pay almost $2K/month for a private pay (no company subsidy), I am thrilled to see some competition. When I went looking for health insurance about 10 years ago, it was virtually impossible.

  6. Just TRY to get a Tea Party person or Republican to sit down and explain exactly what they have against the ACA and they can’t, other then ramble on about “big government” and IRS scandals and somehow Benghazi.

    The ACA is based on plans originally developed by Republicans. It forces people to take personal responsibility (something Republicans supposedly are for) by getting insurance, so the rest of us don’t pick up the tab at emergency rooms, or so people don’t go bankrupt or end up homeless due to health issues.

    The free market (something Republicans supposedly like) is very active in keeping pricing low, and insurance companies (NOT the US government) is who you will get your insurance from.

    For the life of me I can’t see why Republicans (especially all the supposedly religious ones) are foaming at the mouth over the ability for average Americans to get decent health insurance. Exactly why is that so bad?

    Why are Republicans so angry at regular people in our country? Why are they so hateful toward people who maybe weren’t born to wealth? In between cutting food assistance, cutting education assistance, cutting health care for women, etc… how do they sleep at night? It’s mind boggling to me how they can go to church on Sunday and then – with apparent glee – spend the rest of the week trying to figure out how to make other people’s lives more difficult..

  7. Does the ACA define what has to be covered? Yes, net affect, people that have policies that they like are having their policies canceled as of 2014 because they are not ACA complient and they must go out and replace them at a much higher cost.

    Does the ACA tell insurance companies that they may not charge more than XX for old people than young people? Setting this arbitrary ratio makes no underwriting sense and is a concept that only a government could dictate to be used.

    Does the ACA define premium amounts based upon income? Yes, the difference is picked up by the taxpayers who have to pay full premium plus higher taxes.

    Does the ACA dictate the % of premium income that must be used to pay benefits? Yes, again an arbitrary % that may work in some years and not in others but does not allow for a build up of reserves.

    Do people with health issues have to be covered at the same cost as people that do not have health issues? Yes, the result is that healthy people have to pay more for their coverage to cover the cost of the unhealthy ones.

    People who do not have insurance now will not see the need to get it under the ACA if they have to pay anything for it. The stupid tax code in this country has taken heatlh insurance from being something to help in the event of large expenses to something that is supposed to pay for everyday overuse. It is like buying car insurance that pays for car washes and oil changes and new wipers …. and expecting the employer to pay for it.

  8. You left the important information—income—out of that comparison. But yeah, $74/month for health insurance and you can’t be denied or charged a higher rate for preexisting conditions? Brutal!

  9. What you don’t understand, because your a liberal and don’t want to, is that the figure your president is giving you is what they are paying for their policy. That is not what the policy cost. The government is paying the rest. Do you have a clue where the government gets its money?