Find a back issue

DFW Airport Renovated Terminal A. Here’s What it Looks Like Now.

The new, five-story garage adds 7,793 new parking spaces and features “enhanced parking.” I think that means the digital signage which indicates the number of available parking spots as well as the cool lights above parking spots that indicate whether they’re occupied (red), vacant (green), or for handicapped drivers (blue). All photos by Farraz Khan.
The new, five-story garage adds 7,793 new parking spaces and features “enhanced parking.” I think that means the digital signage which indicates the number of available parking spots as well as the cool lights above parking spots that indicate whether they’re occupied (red), vacant (green), or for handicapped drivers (blue). All photos by Farraz Khan.

This morning, DFW Airport struck a blow against decay, Dubai, and those annoying decriers of dilapidated American infrastructure when it unveiled a brand-new portion of Terminal A, equipped with cutting-edge amenities; customer- and eco-friendly design; and a clean, sans-serif, Jetsons-chic aesthetic. It’s all part of the seven-year, $2.3 billion Terminal Renewal and Improvement Plan, which aims “to bring DFW into the 21st century,” according to DFW CEO Jeff Fegan, who spoke during a press conference.

The new terminal is, if I may, the bomb. And I’m not saying that (just) because the good folks at DFW plied me with a sampling of the terminal’s finest: a slice of Ling & Louie’s Mongolian filet mignon flatbread; a Dunkin Donuts mocha latte; an Icebox Café brownie; a chip or two of Qdoba’s chicken nachos; a Salt Lick chopped brisket mini-sandwich; a bit of a Popeyes chicken strip; and a box, or two, of peppermints from Natalie’s Candy Jar.

See for yourself:

DFW coordinated closely with American Airlines to design the interior of the check-in area. It includes the now-familiar new AA logo; sleekly designed, faux-wood-paneled kiosks; and a more easily navigable and efficient check-in process. (Incidentally, “efficient” was an oft-occurring keyword at today’s press conference.)
DFW coordinated closely with American Airlines to design the interior of the check-in area. It includes the now-familiar new AA logo; sleekly designed, faux-wood-paneled kiosks; and a more easily navigable and efficient check-in process. (Incidentally, “efficient” was an oft-occurring keyword at today’s press conference.)
The security checkpoint has been expanded from 1,200 square feet to 8,000 square feet, enabling better traffic-flow. Large, clearly labeled signage also serves efficiency.
The security checkpoint has been expanded from 1,200 square feet to 8,000 square feet, enabling better traffic-flow. Large, clearly labeled signage also serves efficiency.

Terminal A includes 18 new concessions outlets, including the Scottdale-based Ling & Louie’s (a modern-Asian-meets-American-comfort-food casual restaurant), Dallas’ first Salt Lick barbecue location, the Miami-based Icebox (which features scrumptious desserts), an old-fashioned toy store called Geppetto’s, and the Vino Volo wine shop.

Pic 9

As if your kids need another excuse to act like monsters at the airport.
As if your kids need another excuse to act like monsters at the airport.

Additional details for the trivia-hungry:

-Terminal A has ditched the ceramic-tile flooring for Terrazzo flooring, drastically reducing the clickety-clack of high-heels.
-The terminal will feature the largest Public Address Voice Evacuation system in the world.
-It includes energy-efficient glass windows, smart heating and cooling, and electric lighting that responds and dims according to natural, ambient lighting.

Farraz Khan is a D Magazine intern.