Layoffs at D Magazine

Today has been rough. We laid off 12 people, representing just under 10 percent of our total workforce (including D Magazine, D Home, D CEO, D Weddings, D Beauty, and People Newspapers). This time, the layoffs came from the magazine side of the operation; the newspapers were not affected.

When we retrenched in November, we made our cuts based on what we thought at the time was a fairly pessimistic view of how the economy would hold up in 2009. Reality has proven that we were actually not pessimistic enough. As our comrades at the Dallas Morning News and Star-Telegram will attest, these are challenging times for publishers. And bankers. And, well, everyone.

70 comments on “Layoffs at D Magazine

  1. All the best to Adam (and the other 11). Enjoy some quality time off, it’ll soon be springtime in Texas. I look forward to seeing you in the comments.

  2. The good thing about “sabbatical” time is that you can take care of lots of personal stuff that you usually don’t have time for..or don’t make time for.

    You can clean, inventory and fix all the things in and around your home. You may discover enough stuff to have a garage sale and make some money!! You can even Ebay or Craig’s List it!!!

    I know I’ve had the time to conquer files and paperwork and analyze my spending and finances. Who would have thunk that the use of a shredder could be so freeing?!

    I remodeled my pantry, stocked it and now I’m cooking again! I can still be a Foodie right in my own kitchen- sorry to all my beloved restaurants!

    I am determined to make my new Lifestyle work and still live well…as I always have, just on less. (A lot less.)

  3. @ MLK: When I asked our CFO for the figures, he forgot to include the people who work for our People Newspapers. Before the layoffs yesterday, just under 96 people worked for the magazine side, and 29 worked for the newspaper side. Again, the newspaper side was unaffected by the layoffs.

  4. @DM – you’re right. I’m sorry your business closed. What was it? Is there hope you can restructure and reopen?

  5. @Maggie – we’re moving to a connected-project-based freelance team to cut expenses. Re-grouping and reviewing new opps and proposals. thanks for the inquiry.

  6. Dammit, this is all depressing as hell and, yes, scary. Best to Kristiana, Dave, DM and the other out-of-work commenters.

    Not to single out Adam, but he was a core part of the D “brand.” I feel bad for all the fine and talented folk who were let go, but the decision to can Adam was frankly stupid. You hang on to a guy like that through the lean times if you hope to emerge from them strong and with your hard-earned identity intact.

    If the Beatles had fallen on impecunious times (as if, but indulge me here), do think they’d have given ol’ George the heave-ho? Hell no, they wouldn’t!

  7. That’s rich. Now we’re comrades.
    Sorry to all affected.

  8. Sorry to hear about Adam and the D Dozen. I’ve enjoyed reading their work.

    This happened to me a couple of years out of college at what I thought was my dream job. Platitudes about a new door opening ring hollow, but give it time. I was ultimately much better off after a few years. For one thing, I got to move home to Dallas from Houston.

    I invite you to hang out in our treasured East Dallas where people don’t think your job is your life.

  9. From one who only reads Frontburner from a distance, it’s a little like your old crazy uncle dropping dead.

    The DMN has been going down the tubes for years. It offers no real appeal to those people who actually buy a copy. No one wants to read a paper that makes you mad when you read the editorial or letters section. And the stories……

    D is a victim of the economy and will follow the cycle, unlike the DMN.

  10. My condolence to all concerned on what has again been a brutally sad ‘D’ internal exercise in very, very tough times.

    And to Adam I say; Have a quiet talk with your late mother in law. She always had a way of making life glow from within. And on a personal note as someone who knows too well what it is to have the floor pulled out from under him and yet find a cozy nook, may I add; you’re an honorable guy with real seasoned talent and a quirky eye. I’m betting your future will be enviable. God bless.

  11. @Daniel

    You can only be core to a brand if it is clear what that brand is. I’m afraid that few up there actually know what the D brand stands for. Now is the time to regroup, entrench and defend your brand. I hope that all of those that remain figure this out. Quickly.

  12. I wish everyone well. Adam was absolutely wonderful at D. I will mis reading his posts everyday. Very sad time for Frontburner.

  13. Wow. I’m amazed, truly amazed. It’s remarkable that my mom got so tech savvy enough to figure out a way to sign in as so many different commenters to say such nice things. That’s the only way to explain such an outpouring of kindness.

    For reals, I am honored and humbled, flattered and appreciative. All is good and will be well.

    Thanks, everybody. For everything.

  14. This really is Adam’s mom. I am savvy enough, smart enough and just, gosh darned frustrated enough to be happy I
    already have this twitter thing set up. I adore all of
    you who really know Adam. I’ve known him a long time and
    D Magazine lost simply one of their truly greatest assets.
    Jeopardizing recovery from surgery for a website that was
    not going to happen —— well, it sucks.. You all provided good advice and Mick and I know Adam’s strength
    will fortitude and friends like you make him the next great
    catch to whomever (whoever, Adam?) gets to have him
    loyally working for them. Sincerely, Janet McGill (Adam’s
    Mom)

  15. Double doggone darn. This is terrible. I only met Adam twice and both times he was busy doing work stuff for D with a smile.

    I was a contractor doing contract work for the telcos for ten years, 1978 to 1988. I was laid off many times as jobs ended and things changed. I’ve been self employed since then.

    Adam, a bad day on your own is better than your best day working for the man.

  16. I emailed you Adam but it might have already been turned off. You were great to work with, and thanks for my first chance with D CEO. Were it not for you, I wouldn’t have done many things that followed. Sort of the “It’s a Wonderful Life” effect–you being George Bailey.

    You’re a writerly giant with a cool mom.