Leading Off (7/14/14)

Clay Jenkins Standing By Obama. Again. The Dallas County Judge has a long history of working with the Obama Administration. In 2007, he donated $1,000 to the then-senator’s presidential campaign. He also contributed pro bono legal work to the campaign, has worked with the administration to keep a mail processing plant in Dallas open, has helped challenge the voter ID law in Texas, and has joined Obama’s push for a “living wage.” Now there’s the plan to house 2,000 migrant children in Dallas, which Jenkins presented a week after meeting with four White House officials during the U.S. Conference of Mayors. However, reports say Jenkins asked the officials what Dallas could do to help with the children detained in South Texas. More than 57,000 have been detained, though most have been transferred out of those facilities, since October. In other news, experts say there’s little risk of a public health problem emerging related to these children.

Chandler Parsons Headed to the Mavericks. The Houston Rockets had until 11 p.m. last night to match the Mavs’ three-year $46 million offer, but no dice. Around 6 p.m., the Rockets said they wouldn’t make the move. Favorite part of this story: Mark Cuban commenting via his Cyber Dust messaging app, which sounds like Snapchat, no? Are the kids still using these things? Anyway. Welcome to Dallas, Parsons!

Police Chief David Brown Pushing for Unions to Desegregate. There are four – Dallas Latino Peace Officers Association, the Dallas Police Association, the Dallas Fraternal Order of Police, and the Black Police Association of Greater Dallas — and two of them are fighting over a police training academy and claims that black recruits are failing out at a greater rate than their white counterparts. Brown says the fight has proven to be a distraction and has made him play referee. Only problem is that a) the grievances were statistically true and b) some believe Brown favors the BPA, of which he is a member.

$2.7 Million in “Technology” Purchased, Unnecessary in Fort Worth School District. What does this even mean? Someone purchased “technology,” then ordered up maintenance for said “technology,” now the bill is $2.7 million, only discovered through an audit? Sounds like they were trying to manage payroll and grades and attendance records and vendor payments out of the same system. And that system didn’t work. But then there are double payments and maintenance on services not even being used in the mix? Goodness.

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Leading Off (6/16/14)

Future Dallas: Making Strides, Facing Challenges. If you opened the plastic bag full of ads in Sunday’s Dallas Morning News, you found the special report. If not, it’s here, examining the state of Dallas 10 years after it published its “Tipping Point” report. The results then were that Dallas ranked poorly in crime, education, and economic growth. Ten years later, the DMN reports, we’ve improved in one area–public safety.

Where’s the Perot Museum’s Climate Change Exhibit? Well whoops. The nature and science museum’s VP of programs is saying that a 4-by-2.5-foot panel addressing the subject was lost before the museum opened. Now, more than a year later, they’re ordering a temporary panel be hung in the earth sciences hall while they wait for the permanent piece to arrive. Turns out they didn’t realize the panel was missing until reporters started poking around. Hmm.

Josh Brent Released From Jail. The former Dallas Cowboys defensive tackle served time for intoxication manslaughter following the car crash that killed his friend and teammate Jerry Brown. No word on whether he’ll try to be reinstated in the NFL.

Patient Abuse Reported at Parkland. In March, a psychiatric patient spat at nurses and was subsequently restrained and gagged with a toilet paper roll. It took more than three weeks for the hospital to report the incident. One of the nurses involved was also involved in a 2011 incident in which a psychiatric patient was restrained and died.

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Don’t Expect Texas to Actually Do Anything About Earthquakes

There exists in the Texas House of Representatives a Subcommittee on Seismic Activity, which isn’t something you’d think would exist in this state. But it does, and it’s chaired by Denton’s Rep. Myra Crownover. She convened a hearing Monday to discuss the earthquakes that have rattled the southeast corner of Parker County, around Reno and Azle — an area that, until November of last year, had never reported a single felt tremor. It has had dozens now, and the United States Geological Survey suspects it has something to do with disposal wells near the epicenters, where many millions of gallons of waste water from gas wells are pumped nearly two miles beneath the surface, into the Ellenburger Formation. The phenomenon is the subject of a feature story in this month’s issue of D.

It sounds like the height of hubris to claim that humans can cause the earth’s crust to shudder and release unfathomable energies. But we’ve been doing it for decades, here in Texas and elsewhere. The only difference now — the only reason there’s a subcommittee — is that the shaking is happening near a slightly more populous area than in swarms past, and the fears of the people in Parker County can no longer be ignored. Not that the state oil and gas regulator didn’t try at first.

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Brantley Hargrove Lands Book Deal with Simon & Schuster

I want to say something funny here. I want to poke fun at Brantley’s affinity for “cat facts,” or his life in “the bubble,” or his fear of ghosts, or his inexplicable desire to climb–and then jump off of–things he shouldn’t. But no. Today we celebrate.

It’s official: Simon & Schuster will publish D contributor Brantley Hargrove’s forthcoming book about famed storm chaser Tim Samaras and the gigantic tornado–the widest ever recorded–that killed him. The book, tentatively titled The Storm is likely to come out some time in early 2016. It grew out of the reporting Brantley did for this Dallas Observer story last year. I know David Patterson, his agent, is very excited. So is Brantley, though he knows he has a formidable task in front of him.

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In Texas, We’re Temperamental & Uninhibited

The conclusions of a study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology have been making their way around the World Wide Echo Chamber the last couple days. Researchers surveyed thousands of Americans in each state about their levels of openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, neuroticism, and agreeableness, and lumped regions of the country together into one […]

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Dallas Top U.S. City For Smartphones, Tablets

A new survey, cited by Information Week, claims that Dallas leads the 10 biggest U.S. markets when it comes to the percentage of residents who own smartphones and tablets. The data indicate that 76 percent of us have smartphones, 10 percent more than second-place Los Angeles. By contrast, New York has the lowest penetration of smartphones, at […]

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Local Couple Finds Ancient Megalodon Tooth in Florida

Two local high school teachers found something special while on vacation in Venice, Florida recently. Wes and Kerry Kirpach found two halves of a giant shark tooth, experts believe once belonged to a megalodon, a prehistoric shark that may have been up to 60 feet long. Scientists believe the megalodon shark went extinct somewhere between 4 […]

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Sneak Peek at New Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden (aka the Arboretum Expansion)

Yesterday a number of us got to tour the new $62 million, 8-acre Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden at the Arboretum. It will open September 21. We’re on deadline, so I don’t have time to gush too much about this place, but you need to know this: HUGE. With all due respect to the Perot, […]

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Apple to Bring Mac Production to Fort Worth

MacRumors says that Apple is working with Flextronics to create its revamped design of the Mac Pro desktop computer in the Alliance development in the north of Fort Worth. It’s especially significant because it fulfills Apple CEO Tim Cook’s earlier declaration that the company would bring some Mac production back to the U.S. from overseas. […]

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