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Making Dallas Even Better

North Texas Is the Most Competitive Job Market in the U.S.

So says Forbes, citing a study by the job search site CareerBuilder. Their methodology was to compare the number of jobs added between 2014 and 2015 across the 150 biggest metropolitan areas in the United States to the number of jobs that one would expect to have been added considering the national job growth rate of 2 percent:

At the top of the list of the most competitive metros is Dallas, Texas. The area added 112,829 jobs between 2014 and 2015, surpassing expectations by 44,871 jobs.

San Jose, California comes in second with 39,519 jobs added above expectations. As a result, 3.7% of the area’s overall employment is attributed to that competitiveness factor–higher than any other area on the list. (Dallas added the greatest number of jobs during the same period, but San Jose’s growth accounts for a greater percentage of the city’s overall employment.)

Los Angeles, Seattle, and Miami were the rest of the top five “most competitive” markets.

The most disappointing performances (the least competitive) market was Chicago,  which added about 40 percent fewer jobs than expected. It was followed by New York, Philadelphia, New Orleans, and St. Louis.

How much credit do we have to give Plano?

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Airbnb Ranks Oak Lawn One of World’s Trendiest Neighborhoods in 2016

Short-term lodging service Airbnb last week put out a list of the “Top 16 Trending Neighborhoods on Airbnb in 2016.” It’s based on how much growth the site saw in bookings to those neighborhoods during 2015. The top finisher was Chūō-ku in Osaka, Japan, which accommodated 7,000 percent more travelers through Airbnb than it had the previous year.

I was surprised to find I have a personal connection to three of the 16. I lived in District VII of Budapest, Hungary, during one semester of college. I worked in the Richmond area of Melbourne, Australia, for a brief time to help finance a backpacking trip around that country. And I resided in a duplex in Dallas’ Oak Lawn for more than nine years.

That’s right: Of all the neighborhoods in all the world, Oak Lawn is the 11th-trendiest in Airbnb’s reckoning, boasting 260-percent growth in visitors. Only it’s probably not the Oak Lawn you’re thinking of. Look at the results you get when you filter for “Oak Lawn” on Airbnb’s map:

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Questions for the DMN on that Lewisville Dam Story

Finally got to the big dam story everyone is talking about. Good read! Lotsa drama. You can almost hear the scary music playing in the background, foretelling much damage and destruction. Highly enjoyed reading it.

Well, I enjoyed it the first time. The second time I looked it through, a few questions started to form. I wanted some supporting evidence and context that I suspect was not included because it would interrupt the excellent #longform #narrative. Especially after some light Googling. Those questions:

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No, Dallas Doesn’t Lead the Nation in Missed Connections

Yesterday a writer for Vox looked at the number of Craigslist Missed Connections — that glorious corner of the Internet where anyone can anonymously deposit their daydreams about the girl on the train who, swear to God, gave you more than one furtive glance yesterday — for each of the country’s nine biggest cities.

He declares that Dallas put up the most posts (12) per 10,000 residents during his sample period (January 2015), leading one to believe that ours is a city replete with lonely hearts. However, I must question his method, since the population figure he credits to Dallas is for only the city proper while the “Dallas” Craigslist draws posts from throughout North Texas. This matters because while the city of Dallas is only the 9th-largest in terms of population in the U.S., the Dallas-Fort Worth metro is the country’s 4th-largest. So his per capita figures are way off.

If you refigure things based on the latest U.S. Census numbers for metro area population, Dallas is only the fourth-most desperately-seeking-Susan city in the country, with 2.3 posts per 10,000 population. It’s San Diego that most needs to screw up the courage to just go ahead and talk to the cute guy reading Dostoevsky in the coffee shop. Phoenix and San Antonio are also ahead (behind?) Dallas in this department.

What’s more interesting is the writer’s heat map of days of the week and times of day when a Missed Connections post is most likely. Monday is the big winner across the board, but Dallas’ pattern stands out:

Angelenos hardly post, and the few relative spikes in postings occur almost exclusively toward the start of the week. Houstonites, meanwhile, try their hand at romance on early Tuesday afternoons; Dallas, with the highest concentration of missed connections, has an impressive spread from Monday to Friday, with its inhabitants posting throughout the workday and late into the evening.

Props to us for our consistency, I guess.

Coppell Is the 8th-Best Place to Live in the U.S.?

Here’s some of what Money had to say about Coppell, in naming the city on its annual list of the Best Places to Live. Are they trolling Patrick Kennedy?

Coppell has made a virtue of concrete. The ring of freeways that surrounds the town also shields it from Dallas’s sprawl … Those freeways also give residents easy access to the airport (a 10-minute drive) and the big cities of Dallas and Fort Worth.

Clearly the editors of Money have lost their minds, since we established last year that Coppell is only the 13th-best Dallas suburb. You might also remember that the city that topped last year’s Money countdown was McKinney. I don’t believe that its absence in 2015 has anything to do the aftermath of  its pool parties — the magazine seems to like to turn over the entire top 50 each year, alternating between ranking towns with populations of 10K-50K and cities populations 50K-300K — but I’m going to guess that it might keep it from making a return trip in 2016.

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Troy Aikman Hates Potholes. So Does, It Turns Out, Every Other American

Over the weekend, Dallas Cowboys legend (and former auto dealership owner) Troy Aikman was driving in Dallas. Presumably his car hit a pothole. Or maybe he spotted a pothole ahead of him in the road and swerved to avoid it. Maybe he hit a few potholes in a row, or maybe his entire trip felt like he was dodging potholes like Giants linebackers. Whatever the case, Dallas Cowboys legend Tory Aikman was fed up with the damned potholes, and so he got mad. So mad, in fact, he did what all Americans do these days when we’re mad. We Tweet:

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Dallas in 2030: Many More People, Much More Hispanic

You’re probably not surprised to read that 15 years from now the population of the Dallas area is projected to be significantly larger than it is now, with Hispanics accounting for a significantly greater share. The Urban Institute today has released a new interactive map that allows you to see just how significant that growth will be as compared to the rest of the country and to better understand the underlying factors of population change: birth rate, death rate, and migration.

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Does Mike Rawlings Know He’s the Mayor of Dallas, Not Dallas-Fort Worth?

As Mike Rawlings told the Dallas Morning News editorial board recently, he’s “a numbers guy.” So anchoring all the puffery in his new mayor’s letter was one solid factoid: “According to a recent Forbes study, Dallas is now the fourth fastest-growing city in the country.” Wait, what? I mean, without even checking, I instinctively knew that wasn’t true, not by a long shot. What was this claim doing here? I had to get to the bottom of this.

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Best of the Best Lists: 2014 Year in Review

It’s the time of year again when we take a look back at what most tickled the fancies of our readers, and in the case of our content the answer is “best” lists. Magazines are often criticized for being list-centric, but you know why so many magazines lean that way? Because people like to look at lists. Even if it’s just because they want to view our selections and tell us we don’t know what the hell we’re talking about, readers continue to come back for more.

These were the most popular listicles on our website in 2014:

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The Most Popular D Magazine Blog Posts of 2014

If you’re reading this, you’re no doubt already aware that D Magazine Partners does far more than publish a group of glossy monthly magazines. Each day our editors are involved, primarily through our family of blogs, in an ongoing, lively conversation about what’s happening in Dallas.

These were the most popular blog posts of the year on our site:

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D Magazine Staff Writer Michael J. Mooney Is a Very Popular Writer, Part 2,136

Ahhh December. Time for egg nog, racist uncles, and Best Of lists. You may remember my colleague Michael J.Mooney’s “How Not to Get Away With Murder,” from our December issue. Well, it turns out that was the third most-popular story on Longform this year, trailing only stories about Radio Shack and serial killers.

The story WAS NOT however, selected as one of the 10 best stories of the year by Longform’s editors. (Have to keep him humble.) Better luck next year, Michael.

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Dallas Rates Well on LGBT Inclusion. The Suburbs Not So Much.

The Human Rights Campaign, a nonprofit organization working on behalf of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights, issued a report today called the Municipal Equality Index in which 353 American cities were rated on their inclusion of, and support for, LGBT residents.

Dallas scored well, 91 out of a possible 100, credited especially with having enacted nondiscrimination laws and for city leadership’s support of the LGBT community. Among the state’s biggest cities only Austin did better (a perfect 100.) Fort Worth got an 83.

But, according to HRC’s standards, Dallas’ suburbs have a ways to go. Irving and Mesquite scored perfect zeroes. Plano got a 22. McKinney a 12, Arlington 11, and Garland a 10.

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