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Arlington is the 6th-Most Conservative City in the U.S.

The Economist today published a chart ranking the relative conservatism vs. liberalism of American cities with a population greater than 250,000. Mesa, Arizona, is the country’s most conservative, while San Francisco is the most liberal.

Arlington, Texas, is the sixth-most conservative. Fort Worth is 12th-most. Meanwhile, Dallas is a relative bastion of godless hedonism, falling (like most of the cities on the list) to the more liberal end of the scale. I’m not sure why Plano, which also has a population greater than 250K, isn’t represented on the chart. Maybe they were going by 2000 Census numbers.

Their data are based on an article in this month’s American Political Science Review, though I’m sure I didn’t have to tell you that.

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The Dallas Version of Basic

At Jezebel, Erin Gloria Ryan has a super-entertaining guide to every sub-category of “basic” in the United States. The Dallas entry:

Job: Real estate. Maybe marketing.
Drives: A massive SUV her dad bought for her.
Wears: Kendra Scott jewelry, Tori Burch accessories, 7 For All Mankind or Citizens of Humanity jeans. A statement necklace if it’s a special occasion.
Listens to: 106.1 KISS FM.
Spends her summers: Being a bridesmaid. She has been a bridesmaid like 15 times.
Celebrity aspiration: Jessica Simpson.

Do you agree? If you don’t, you’re probably basic. Just kidding. Kind of. No, really. Maybe.

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Dallas, Capital of the Great Plains

Forbes has got some more link bait for us in its new issue. Joel Kotkin draws a fun little map of the United States of America as it truly is. Not one nation under God, but “seven nations and three quasi-independent city-states, each with its own tastes, proclivities, resources and problems.” Dallas is declared the capital […]

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Mapping Dallas-Fort Worth’s Racial Divide

That there is a map that is part of a series Wired is calling “The Best Map Ever Made of America’s Racial Segregation.” For anyone familiar with the region, this map doesn’t really reveal anything we already didn’t know (the African American and Hispanic south and southwest; the homogenized north surrounded by minority enclaves like […]

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Richard Patterson on Jim Schutze’s “Culture Mob”

Richard Patterson is a big-deal British painter who lives in Dallas. After reading my post yesterday about Jim Schutze’s anti-intellectual view of the Nasher, Richard sent me a few words on the topic. And by “few,” I mean 2,400. Bear in mind, he banged out this ditty in about two hours. It makes me angry […]

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Social Mobility and the Legacy of Slavery in Dallas

Readers of Andrew Sullivan’s Dish blog pointed out the similarities between the social mobility map that we posted about Monday, a map of African-American population by county, and a map of the last U.S. slave census in 1860 (seen above). There are striking similarities, especially in the dark patches along the Mississippi River in both maps. […]

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The Changing Face of Poverty Across Dallas

Recently the Urban Institute created a mapping tool to show how pockets of poverty across the country have changed and expanded over the last 30 years. Using Census data, they placed dots on the map for every 20 people with incomes below the poverty line. Whites are represented in blue, blacks are yellow, Hispanics green, […]

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Leading Off (5/13/13)

Where Do Saturday’s Elections Leave Hispanic Dallas City Council Representation? The answer, in short, is not in a good way. In a newly drawn district that is 74 percent Hispanic, incumbent Scott Griggs defeated Hispanic incumbent Delia Jasso. In another new district drawn to give Pleasant Grove single representation at the horseshoe (the neighborhood was […]

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DFW Had the Largest Population Increase in the Country Last Year, Says the Census Bureau

Nearly 132,000 new residents showed up in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington metro area between July 2011 and July 2012, the U.S. Census Bureau announced yesterday, making it the area with the largest numeric increase in the country over that period. The Houston- The Woodlands- Sugar Land area came in second, so eat it Houston. Dallas County […]

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DFW Is Still Class-Divided, But It’s Getting Better

The Atlantic Cities project is currently exploring the divides of class and wealth in American cities, and today’s take was on Dallas-Fort Worth. It was aided by research from UT-Arlington doctoral candidate (and Shiny Around The Edges frontman) Michael Seman. They found: The class divide in the city of Dallas largely follows a north-south axis demarcated by […]

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