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How City Staff and Toll Road-Backers Misled Mayor Mike Rawlings

As Tim pointed out in Leading Off, there is some tremendous reporting in the Dallas Morning News today from transportation writer Brandon Formby. In his article, Formby lays out the entire chronology of the efforts by former City Manager Mary Suhm and Trinity Commons Foundation Executive Director Craig Holcomb to save the Trinity Toll Road project in the face of mounting opposition. The report comes ahead of today’s private luncheon reveal of the so-called Dream Team’s reworked vision for the road.

The piece pulls back the curtain on just how power brokers have pressed their influence on the mayor, rallying financial support for the pro-road effort, editing his op-eds, counseling him with misinformation or half-truths about the essential features of the road, and coming up with the idea of the dream team and setting the parameters of that groups’ deliberations.

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Who Is In Charge of the Trinity River Project?

Over the weekend, Mark Lamster filed an illuminating report from Houston, comparing that city’s successful clean-up of Buffalo Bayou with our own ill-fated attempts to reclaim the Trinity. The whole thing is worth reading, but towards the end, Lamster raises an important question:

Who, exactly, is in charge of the Trinity Corridor project? There is no ready answer.

Indeed, as I mention towards the end of this piece from last week, one of the frustrating aspects of the Trinity River Project is that the plan’s so-called advocates, like The Trinity Trust, are mum when it comes to things like the proposed Trinity Toll Road, which is poised to ruin some of the more positive, park-friendly amenities they have already brought to the Trinity greenbelt. Lamster attributes this to a general lack of accountability with regards to a civic project that has way too many agencies and organizations with their hands in the pie. And what are the results?

While the Trinity River Audubon Center is a civic jewel, this process has also produced a pedestrian bridge that leads to a no-man’s land on its downtown side; a whitewater rapids that doesn’t work properly; a horse park that provides no value to the vast majority of Dallasites; and plans for lakes and fields and trails that languish as the city mulls an ill-conceived toll road that would cut those amenities off from the very citizens they are intended to serve.

In Houston, they have a park.

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Read Jon Bois’ Eulogy For RadioShack

If you didn’t read this — SBNation’s Jon Bois writing about his days working for RadioShack — when it ran last year, now is a good time to do it. A taste:

This is a consumer technology business that is built to work perfectly in the year 1975. The Internet comes around, and this, being a technology company, is expected to move on it aggressively and know what it’s doing, except basically nobody really understood the Internet for a very long time. So they whiffed big a few times. Then the iPhone came around and rendered half the stuff RadioShack sold completely redundant. This company needed to become something radically different a decade ago. I just don’t think it knows how to be anything else.

It’s like retracing the steps and doings of a drunk person: okay, here’s where he keyed the cop car. Wait, why’d he do that? I don’t know, but his pants are lying here, so this is before he stripped naked and tried to rob the library.

ALSO: the CueCat makes a cameo.

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Does Mike Rawlings Know He’s the Mayor of Dallas, Not Dallas-Fort Worth?

As Mike Rawlings told the Dallas Morning News editorial board recently, he’s “a numbers guy.” So anchoring all the puffery in his new mayor’s letter was one solid factoid: “According to a recent Forbes study, Dallas is now the fourth fastest-growing city in the country.” Wait, what? I mean, without even checking, I instinctively knew that wasn’t true, not by a long shot. What was this claim doing here? I had to get to the bottom of this.

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Here Are the People Who May Decide Dallas’ Future

Mayor Mike announced, in Mark Lamster’s words, his “rethink the toll-road squad” this morning. Tim, assuredly, will be along with additional thoughts on this later this morning. But here are the names on the squad, and what they may bring, Cliffs Notes version:

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Why Do We Need to Spend a Quarter-Billion Dollars on the Dallas Convention Center?

Late last week, Philip Jones, president of the Dallas Convention and Visitors Bureau, tossed out his plan to seek up to $300 million to expand and fix up the convention center; you can read about it here ($200 – $250 million version), or here (up to $300 million version). Better yet, watch an over-the-top enthusiastic narration of the plan by recent WFAA hire Monica Hernandez here (up to $250 million version). This, on the heels of an announcement earlier in the week that the city of Dallas was spending $27 million on a high-end restaurant complex and parking garage adjacent to the convention center complex.

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There’s Gotta Be a Better Way to Say This, First Baptist

The Bible verse, from the King James Version:

I ask then: Did God reject his people? By no means! I am an Israelite myself, a descendant of Abraham, from the tribe of Benjamin. God did not reject his people, whom he foreknew. Don’t you know what Scripture says in the passage about Elijah—how he appealed to God against Israel: “Lord, they have killed your prophets and torn down your altars; I am the only one left, and they are trying to kill me?” And what was God’s answer to him? “I have reserved for myself seven thousand who have not bowed the knee to Baal.”

See you on Sunday.

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Some of The Continental Avenue Bridge’s Chess Tables Are Set Up Incorrectly

The new Continental Avenue Bridge park is, by all accounts, pretty awesome. Pedestrians, bicycles, and OH, chess tables! Yes! One problem, according to D contributor David Hopkins: they’re set up wrong. David—who knows way more about chess than I ever will—went on to say that he will not sleep until the error is corrected.

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