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Making Dallas Even Better

Leading Off (5/24/16)

Susan Hawk in Houston indefinitely. The Dallas County District Attorney, who returned to the Menninger Clinic in Houston due to severe depression, doesn’t have a return date set yet. She was treated there last year before resuming her work in Dallas. Messina Madson, Hawk’s top prosecutor, will deal with daily office goings-on in the meantime.

Loose dogs captured in Oak Cliff. The loose dog problem continued when two dogs allegedly bit a man in east Oak Cliff yesterday morning. Police and animal control officers ended up capturing the dogs after fending the dogs off themselves.

High-speed internet coming to southern dallas. AT&T is aiming to bring high-speed internet to southern Dallas neighborhoods, which will help residents and businesses become more connected. Executives from AT&T are announcing the plan at a press conference this morning at Dallas City Hall. Mayor Rawlings says this shows that major companies are now concentrating on southern Dallas.

Dallas bachelorette JoJo Fletcher begins her journey to find love. The 25-year-old’s season premiered last night. It entailed a man riding in on a horse dressed as a unicorn, a guy wearing a kilt, another guy dressed as Santa Claus, and, obviously, alcohol-fueled antics. Good luck, JoJo.

Labor Secretary Lauds Southwest Airlines For Fair Compensation

U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez praised Southwest Airlines today for the way it compensates some of its workers. Addressing a national conference of business journalists in greater Washington, D.C., Perez said the decline of “union density” over the years had led to lower wages and contributed to income inequality. Today “there’s no leverage to […]

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Study: DFW Airport Quakes, Most Texas Quakes Caused by Humans

just-released University of Texas/SMU study has found that humans (specifically oil and gas industry activity) have been causing earthquakes in Texas since at least the 1920s. Some of this seismic activity is associated with the injection of fluids (usually wastewater) into the ground, while others involved oil and gas or fluid extraction. Say the scientists:

Altogether, for the 162 Texas earthquakes having magnitudes of 3 or greater and occurring between 1975 and 2015, we categorize 42 (26%) as almost certainly induced, 53 (33%) as probably induced, 45 (28%) as possibly induced, and the remaining 21 (13%) as tectonic

The study notes that analysis of the string of quakes centered near the old Texas Stadium site in Irving is not yet complete, but it does devote a section to discussing seismic activity at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport between 2008 and 2013:

We and others conclude that the DFW airport earthquakes were induced because of the absence of historical seismicity prior to injection, the proximity of the injection well to a known mapped fault, the onset of activity only six weeks after injection commenced in 2008, and the earthquake depths at and below the depth of injection.

What do the government regulators charged with monitoring the oil and gas industry have to say about these findings? A Railroad Commission spokesperson told the Morning News the study’s methods — admittedly based on somewhat subjective questions and drawing correlations from the data — are arbitrary.

God bless Texas.

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Poll: Should We Buy Southern Dallas Another Grocery Store?

This is a tricky one. On the one hand, living in a free-market-loving country and state as we do, it’s hard not to experience cognitive dissonance when we hear about the government having to pay money (or grant big tax breaks) to bring businesses to town.

Did Dallas really need to give the Richards Group $1.8 million to subsidize the building of its parking-garage-with-an-office-on-top in one of the most desirable, walkable neighborhoods in the city? Or $450,000 to Zale Corp. to move to a segment of the city so remote that most of the economic benefits will likely spill into the suburbs? Or $3 million to a multibillion dollar big-box retailer to set up shop in North Dallas?

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Leading Off (5/17/16)

Urban farm coming to downtown. There’s a vacant lot located between Deep Ellum and the Dallas Farmers Market that will likely become an urban farm by next year. Yesterday, the City Council’s Economic Development Committee concurred that this is a good idea. The urban farm will help returning veterans learn how to work the land and will provide fresh produce that people can purchase.

Wrong apartment set on fire, woman dies. 58-year-old Debra Williams died at Parkland from fire-related burns at her southeast Dallas apartment. The fire was set as revenge for a gang-related shooting, except it was meant for someone else. The gunman in the shooting was Christopher Deon Shaw, and police sources believe that someone set the fire thinking one of Shaw’s friends lived at the apartment.

I-30 Cedars exit to be closed for months. Eastbound I-30’s exit for Lamar Street, which takes drivers to downtown and The Cedars neighborhood, will close this Friday evening and will be closed until the fall. This closure is part of the Horseshoe Project, which aims to revamp where I-30 and I-35E meet.

Hail expected today. It’s been a hail-heavy rainy season. Today’s storms could bring quarter-sized hail to North Texas. And of course, a whole lot of rain.

Amazon Prime Launches One-Hour Restaurant Delivery in Dallas

Amazon Prime members in Dallas now can get one-hour delivery from local restaurants via the Prime Now app and website. The company is providing free delivery on all orders. The service is launching in Dallas and Manhattan on Monday and joins Baltimore, Seattle, Portland, Chicago, Austin, San Francisco, San Diego, and Los Angeles, which already have the offering.

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The Business of Wikipedia: How Jimmy Wales Built the Free Encyclopedia

As the founder of Wikipedia, Jimmy Wales created what has become the modern day encyclopedia for a generation of Millennials. While it attracts billions of visitors every month and has become the fifth most visited website in the world, there’s one thing it’s not. “As a business, it’s a pretty terrible,” Wales said, adding that the site is financially backed by the nonprofit the Wikimedia Foundation. “It exists based on donations.”

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Dallas City Council Approves $3 Million to Lure Costco

After a long debate during which nearly every member of the Dallas City Council expressed a desire to do more to help underdeveloped southern Dallas, a 10-5 vote granted $3 million to multi-billion-dollar big-box retailer Costco to bring a new store to North Dallas.

The discussion centered on whether the city’s finite economic development resources should be spent on recruiting Costco to its proposed site along Coit Road near the High Five interchange, which is hardly in the sort of “food deserts” found in other parts of the city.

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Sam Wyly Committed Tax Fraud, May Owe IRS $1.4 Billion

A bankruptcy-court judge yesterday found that Dallas former-billionaire Sam Wyly and his late brother Charles committed tax fraud by putting more than $1 billion in trusts in the Isle of Man in the 1990s.

Wyly filed for bankruptcy protection in 2014, after he and Charles were found liable for $299 million in damages for federal securities violations involving the same trusts. Joseph Guinto wrote in D Magazine about the potential problems for the Wylys ahead of the SEC trial in 2013.

In the October 2015 issue of D CEO, John Browning described what was unusual about the Wylys’ bankruptcy strategy:

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