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Readers Share Their #HiddenDallas Secrets

The February cover story of D Magazine features “89 secret things to eat, drink, see, and explore in your city.” The package is called “Hidden Dallas,” and I hope by now you’ve had a chance to peruse our staff’s findings.

On Monday we also told you about a little contest we’re holding in conjunction with the issue. We want to hear about the hidden corners of the city that you treasure most. Share them on social media with the hashtag #HiddenDallas before February 28. We’ll pick our favorite, most insightful tip and give a $200 gift card to Marie Gabrielle Restaurant & Gardens in return.

Meanwhile, here’s a sampling of what we’ve received so far:

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Poll: Will You Vote in Local Elections?

In the February issue of D Magazine, Wick writes that this May’s Dallas council elections could revolutionize the city:

Because of term limits, six seats are open, the largest number in one election in memory. The ones giving up their seats are among the worst council members in the city’s history (Dwaine Caraway excepted). Luckily, the remaining council members are among the brightest and most thoughtful ever to serve. It would take only a few new members of the same caliber to tip the balance.

So this time the candidates do matter. Beware the guy who promises to fix the pothole on your street. That’s another go-along, get-along sort who will be easily co-opted by the city staff. Embrace instead the candidate who talks about growing the tax base as a whole so we can fix all the potholes and reduce your tax burden at the same time.

Is that enough to get you fired up about voting?

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Share Your #HiddenDallas Secrets, Win a Fabulous Prize

The cover story of the February issue of D Magazine is “Hidden Dallas.” It was painful for our staff to publicly share this compilation of their favorite secret spots, special deals, off-menu meals, and insider know-how with our readers. When more people know, for example, how you can dine at Lucia (which is usually booked up weeks […]

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Leading Off (1/23/15)

High-Speed Rail Line Likened to Berlin Wall. Judging by the responses we’ve seen in the comments of previous articles about the possibility, Dallas residents seem generally excited about the prospect of a high-speed rail line being built that will mean Houston is just 90 minutes away by train. But WFAA spoke with several Ellis County landowners who are none too excited about their property being divided by the project.

Prime Prep to Merge With Another School. The struggling charter academy, co-founded by former NFL star Deion Sanders, will reportedly hook up with another Oak Cliff campus, Triple A Academy. It’s not clear whether Triple A’s recent 117-10 basketball win had anything to do with the decision.

Cowboys Fan Sues NFL For $88 Billion. Terry Hendrix is upset about the officials’ reversal of Dez Bryant’s catch during this year’s playoff game against the Green Bay Packers, claiming damages for the league’s “negligence, breach of fiduciary duty, and also reckless disregard.” The hand-written lawsuit was filed on Wednesday. Also of note, Hendrix is incarcerated in a Colorado correctional institution.

Dogs Mysteriously Disappearing in Wise County. And there’s “not one shred of physical evidence that proves the dogs were taken.” Has the pet rapture begun?

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Dallas in 2030: Many More People, Much More Hispanic

You’re probably not surprised to read that 15 years from now the population of the Dallas area is projected to be significantly larger than it is now, with Hispanics accounting for a significantly greater share. The Urban Institute today has released a new interactive map that allows you to see just how significant that growth will be as compared to the rest of the country and to better understand the underlying factors of population change: birth rate, death rate, and migration.

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D Magazine Contest Winner Memorializes Young Wylie Soccer Player

Throughout 2014, D Magazine held a series of giveaways for some pretty great prizes. In December the contest was centered around the “Season of Giving.” The winner would get to choose a charity to which a $2,000 donation would be made via the Communities Foundation of Texas.

The folks at CFT — who work with the people raising money for many worthy causes — were so moved by the story of the winner of our contest that they suggested we tell you a little bit more about her and her family. So that’s what I’m going to do.

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Poll: Should Dallas Put Fluoride in Its Water?

It’s tough sometimes to know which “experts” we’re supposed to believe, especially when scientific consensus also has a way of changing its collective mind as researchers learn more. It can be confusing to mere lay-folk like you (most of you, anyway) and me.

For years we’ve heard that fluoride in our drinking water is an absolute good and has promoted dental health for decades. But now, as Tim noted last week, scientists have concerns about the chemical’s neurotoxic effects. These concerns have been raised to the Dallas City Council, which will vote Jan. 28 on a contract to continue fluoridating the city’s water supply. Should they continue the practice?

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Leading Off (1/16/15)

South Dallas Residents Don’t Want New Toll Lanes. Wait, I thought opposing the construction of new pay-to-play roads was classist and racist and that folks south of Interstate 30 are clamoring for the opportunity to pay to drive their cars to points north? Then why were those who showed up to a Tuesday meeting at Methodist Dallas Medical Center to discuss the proposed Southern Gateway project — redoing Interstate 35E south of Colorado Boulevard — so upset about the idea to include managed toll lanes in the plans? Listen to this:

“We don’t want this. We don’t want these tollways here. Not in Oak Cliff,” said Juanita Lozano, drawing an “amen” and applause from the crowd.

And this:

“You’re creating a system where people with means can zip from one end of this area to the other while they wave at the rest of us on the sidelines,” said Michael Amonett.

And how about this?

“Where will you get the additional land you need?” asked Alicia Quintans, who lives near I-35E and observes its daily traffic flow.

“There’s maybe two hours of the day when traffic is jumbled up on I-35,” she said, “and I don’t understand why we’re building these toll lanes for two hours of the day.”

Oil Boom Headed For Bust? We’re all still enjoying the cheap gasoline, but as prices have dropped, drilling budgets have been slashed and industry layoffs have begun. Concern of a sustained downturn is growing.

Hipster Wedding Chapel Denied by City. The owners of the Bows and Arrows floral shop were fixing up an East Dallas mansion to host weddings, but their request to rezone the home for that purpose was denied last week by the Plan Commission.

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Will Jacqueline Buckingham Anderson Bring Her ‘Practice’ to the Crow Collection?

The Crow Collection of Asian Art just announced the creation of a Wellness Institute, to be directed by Jacqueline Buckingham Anderson, “a recognized advocate in the field of wellness and lifestyle medicine,” and the wife of Dallas Museum of Art director Maxwell Anderson.

The institute is designed to host sessions related to health and wellness, meditation, tai chi, family yoga, and “other practices.” Does that mean that Mrs. Anderson will spread the gospel of her own peculiar “practice,” which we got a sneak peek of in 2013? We can only hope.

Here’s the full press release:

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Poll: Where Is Dallas?

Last night’s arrival of the national spotlight on our area, thanks to the first official college football national title game out in Arlington, plus the recent downtown highway debates that have centered on whether what’s good for the region is necessarily good for the city of Dallas, raise again the question of how best to brand ourselves to the outside world.

So where do we live?

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The Stewpot Resurrects a Ghost of Dallas at 508 Park

Back in October, we posted an item in our Ghosts of Dallas series featuring the restoration of 508 Park by the Stewpot of First Presbyterian Church. Today, as you can see above, the project unveiled the re-creation of the mural that originally appeared on the building, which was a Warner Bros. film vault and recording studio way back when.

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Leading Off (1/9/15)

Dallas ISD Dropping Some Tests. Kindergarteners, first-graders, and second-graders in DISD will no longer have to take twice-a-year Assessments of Course Performance in music, art, and gym after changes announced by district administrators on Thursday. The move comes after a widespread community outcry about the number of exams students must face. Results from the December ACPs will still count toward students’ grades. In case you’re curious about what’s on a second-grade gym test, one part required the kids to “demonstrate mature form in skipping.” Pretty sure I’d fail.

Deputy Fire Chief to Retire After Line-of-Duty Death Investigation. Bobby Ross was the commander on the scene when Dallas firefighter Stanley Wilson died. An internal affairs complaint filed with the department indicated that Ross made a “false and evasive” explanation of the orders he’d given that day. He wasn’t officially punished but was reassigned to the communications section. His resignation is reportedly official on Tuesday.

Did Diabetes Cause Murder of Kaufman County DAs? Eric Williams was sentenced to death last month for killing Mike McLelland and his wife Cynthia. On Thursday he underwent a brain scan that his attorneys hope will show diabetes-caused brain damage that led to his rampage. Then they would argue he deserves a new trial or a reduction in punishment.

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Who Was the Real Chris Kyle?

Was Chris Kyle a saintly defender of liberty or a racist serial killer? Possibly both or neither? A court has said he lied about taking down Jess Ventura, and he made other dubious claims during his life, but should that take anything away from his military service to our country?

The release of Clint Eastwood’s film adaptation of Kyle’s memoir, American Sniper — which still is showing in only four theaters in the U.S. (including AMC NorthPark) and won’t go wide until next week — has brought renewed attention to our own D Magazine story about the man. You can see in the comments to that piece, as well as many of those other items we’ve posted about Kyle here on FrontBurner, that there is disagreement among readers about how he should be remembered.

This week the Guardian took note of the reaction to the film and reviews of it, and Lindy West correctly writes that among a certain group — those with a black-and-white/good-vs.-evil worldview — any criticism of Kyle is treated as an attack on America itself. For these people:

There is no room for the idea that Kyle might have been a good soldier but a bad guy; or a mediocre guy doing a difficult job badly; or a complex guy in a bad war who convinced himself he loved killing to cope with an impossible situation; or a straight-up serial killer exploiting an oppressive system that, yes, also employs lots of well-meaning, often impoverished, non-serial-killer people to do oppressive things over which they have no control. Or that Iraqis might be fully realised human beings with complex inner lives who find joy in food and sunshine and family, and anguish in the murders of their children. Or that you can support your country while thinking critically about its actions and its citizenry. Or that many truths can be true at once.

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