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D CEO Named Best Regional Business Magazine in U.S.—Again

The Alliance of Area Business Publishers is a national outfit that represents regional and local business magazines and newspapers with a combined circulation of more than 1.2 million. Every year the group puts on an editorial competition that recognizes excellence in journalism, photography, and design. This year the competition drew more than 620 entries, with judging by faculty members from the University of Missouri School of Journalism. Among nine AABP awards for 2015 that D CEO picked up at the group’s conference Saturday night—compared to the seven it won last year and eight in 2013—D‘s business publication was named the best regional business magazine in America, for the third straight year. All the details are over on our business site, D Business Daily.

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D CEO Again Named Best Regional Business Magazine in U.S.

For the third straight year, D CEO was named the country’s best regional business magazine in The Alliance of Area Business Publishers’ annual Editorial Excellence awards. The “gold” or first-place award for Best Magazine was one of D CEO’s nine awards in the annual competition, which honors excellence in journalism, photography, and design. In all […]

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Welcome to ‘Five Flags Over Texas. Plus One We Don’t Really Want to Talk About.’

Given the current move to eliminate all things Confederate, isn’t it just a matter of time before the history rewriters set their sights on Six Flags Over Texas? After all, the flag of the Confederate States of America (1861-1865) is one of six referenced by the theme park name. While the CSA flag is not the “battle flag” that’s under fire these days, even statues and other memorials associated with the Confederacy have become prime targets for eradication recently.

“At one time, the park had a themed section called The Confederacy, and the Confederate Battle Flag was used as part of the theming and a civil war re-enactment,” says Six Flags spokeswoman Sharon Parker. “The name of that section of the park was changed to The Old South in the mid-1990s and all Confederate Battle Flags were removed. Six Flags Over Texas continues to fly the Confederate States of America Flag, but does not fly or sell any variation of the Confederate Battle Flag.”

Chances are, that explanation won’t cut it with the rewrite crowd. So get ready for, “Welcome to ‘Five Flags Over Texas. Plus One We Don’t Really Want To Talk About.’ “

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How Dallas Played a Starring Role in Jeb Bush’s ‘Disjointed’ Presidential Campaign

For many months, the main strategy of Republican presidential hopeful Jeb Bush was to pile up so much loot from donors—the initial prediction was for $100 million in 180 days—that potential rivals would run away from the race with their tails between their legs. As a result of the big-money ploy, the thinking went, W’s brother would be seen as the inevitable nominee. (Among Jeb’s local supporters is oil-and-gas billionaire Trevor Rees-Jones, who serves on Bush’s Texas Leadership Committee.) But now, for a variety of reasons, Jeb’s grand plan really hasn’t worked out. And, according to this story in the Washington Post, it all began to unravel inside a Hyatt hotel at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

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Ruth, Roger—and an Absent Ebby—Steal the Show at Volunteer Luncheon

For years, philanthropist and civic leader Ruth Altshuler was saying Monday, the motto of residential real estate doyenne Ebby Halliday Acers was “Don’t smoke, don’t drink, and don’t retire.” But now, at the age of 104, the woman best known simply as Ebby has retired. That didn’t keep the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas from honoring her, though, with one of its “Decades of Distinction” awards during a luncheon at the Hilton Anatole yesterday. The award was presented by longtime United Way supporters Altshuler and former Dallas Cowboys quarterback Roger Staubach, a pair that riffed at times like George Burns and Gracie Allen—or Kathy Griffin and Anderson Cooper.

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Banker ‘Chuck’ Gummer Snags Top Award at United Way Volunteer Event

Some of the region’s biggest companies and most iconic business leaders were honored Monday at the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas‘ sixth annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon and Awards Ceremony at the Hilton Anatole hotel in Dallas.

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Fearon to Business Community: Early Childhood Education Will Impact Labor Force

Educator and philanthropist Regen Horchow Fearon had a warning for the Dallas business community Tuesday: If children aren’t nourished and stimulated during the first five years of their lives—when 90 percent of human brain growth occurs—there could be dire consequences for business and society down the road.

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Rick Perry 2.0

More than three years after Rick Perry’s presidential hopes were dashed in his famous “Oops” moment, the former Texas governor is said to have boned up on the issues and seems revved to go for it again, this time with a new twist or two. At Dallas’ Tower Club yesterday, Perry implied before delivering a real stem-winder that Gov. Greg Abbott was giving in to the conspiracy crowd on the Jade Helm 15 military exercises. In a Q&A he also defended the so-called Texas Dream Act, which lets illegal immigrants apply for in-state tuition. “Rick Perry, the unlikely voice of reason!” someone said, skeptically, later in the day.

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NY Times: Jaap Mentioned in Search for New Conductor at New York Philharmonic

Late last year in the Big Apple, guest conductor Jaap van Zweden led the New York Philharmonic in some bang-up performances that were met with “rowdy enthusiasm.” But, was he so good that the New Yorkers decided they want him full-time? According to a report today in The New York Times, the Dallas Symphony Orchestra music director is among those who’ve been mentioned in a search to succeed Philharmonic music director Alan Gilbert when Gilbert steps down in 2017. Says Denise McGovern, the DSO’s communications director: “There’s nothing to say right now about what they’re doing. There have been reports speculating on a lot of different things. I don’t have any information about that. He’s here, and his contract with us is through” the 2018-2019 season.

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Rates Doubling at ‘Twilight Zone of Parking Garages’ in Arts District

Matthew Fields, who manages parking at Trammell Crow Center in the Dallas Arts District, is suddenly a very popular guy. “My phone’s been ringing off the hook,” Fields says, adding that his email’s been blowing up, too–all from people who want to park in his underground garage. The reason: the nearby Hall Arts Parking facility is jacking up its monthly rates a whopping 100 percent, effectively doubling monthly rents as of June 1, from $75 to $150 or $65 to $140 for unreserved parking spots.

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Garth Brooks, Just Being Himself, Stars at ACM Fundraising Gala

The Academy of Country Music’s first Lifting Lives Gala, held Friday night at the Omni Dallas Hotel, was all about Garth Brooks, the monster-selling country singer/songwriter who once “retired” from the business to be a stay-at-home dad. The Oklahoma native returned to recording and touring worldwide in 2014, many years after scoring big hits with well-crafted, hard-country tunes like “Friends in Low Places,” “Beaches of Cheyenne,” and “Much Too Young (To Feel This Damn Old).” In recognition of his return he’s a nominee for Entertainer of the Year at Sunday’s 50th anniversary ACM Awards at Arlington’s AT&T Stadium.

The Omni bash, which benefited Brooks’ Teammates for Kids Foundation and so-called Child Life Zones at two local hospitals, at times seemed more like a tribute to Brooks, who’s rejoined the music game at a time when the generic “bro-country” sound dominates mainstream country radio. In contrast to those mindless, pop/electronic paeans to beer, tailgates, and girls in cut-off jeans, Brooks’ songs sound downright epic, dealing with time-honored country themes like rodeo and don’t-give-a-s*** mavericks with the cojones to confront an ex at a pretentious black-tie soiree.

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Reaction to Art Ball Video is Over-the-Top and Ridiculous

Can you say s-t-r-e-t-c-h? Yesterday, our colleague Peter posted Saturday night’s Art Ball video, a knock-off spoof of the song “Uptown Funk” starring the likes of Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, DMA director Maxwell Anderson, Deedie Rose, Cindy and Howard Rachofsky, and other art-crowd bigwigs. Peter also recalled a previous (admittedly tone-deaf) ball video spoofing “Downton Abbey.” Then he proceeded to rip Rawlings, throw a bouquet to mayoral contender Marcus Ronquillo, and somehow relate it all to the Trinity River tollroad debate. That opened the floodgates for commenters (here and elsewhere), who variously accused the video cast of elitism, racism, ripping off taxpayers, and making a “mockery” of … something or other.

Give me a break. Please. This blowback is so over-the-top and ridiculous, it’s embarrassing. First off, the “Funk” takeoff was a sponsor video, intended to thank the sponsors of Saturday’s fundraiser in a light-hearted and creative manner. (The sponsors are those who help pay for the event.) Second, the video was actually entertaining, imagined and edited with a deft touch. Third, the people in the video were making fun of themselves as much as anything (Rawlings in hair curlers? The usually buttoned-down Anderson looking like Nathan Lane in “The Birdcage”?) Last, the racism charge is offensive. Leaving aside that the video cast was not all-white, the fact is that it’s people with money—regardless of the color of their skin—who bankroll institutions like the DMA, which has been able to offer free admission and free membership to all comers precisely because of events like Saturday night’s. Welcome to the real world, people.

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Glenn Greenwald in North Texas: NSA Surveillance Program is ‘Antithesis’ of Fourth Amendment

Glenn Greenwald, the lawyer and journalist who became a left-wing celebrity for his articles helping whistle-blower Edward Snowden expose the NSA’s mass-surveillance program, admits enjoying the reaction when critics discovered he would be in North Texas to appear on Glenn Beck’s right-wing radio show—and then to address the conservative National Center for Policy Analysis.

Talking Friday to about 250 people at a luncheon meeting of the NCPA, a Dallas think tank that’s headed now by tea party hero Allen West, Greenwald said of the kerfuffle that was particularly created by his Beck appearance: “I love it.” He recalled trading barbs with “people on Twitter who thought it was a terrible thing to do.” But, he added, “I’ve made it a point to find common ground. I find that’s a healthy thing to do.”

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In Dallas, Comedian Dana Carvey Recalls Barbara Bush Calling H. Ross Perot and Bill Clinton Clowns

Actor and stand-up comedian Dana Carvey took a few shots at Dallas and Dallasites while headlining a charity event at the Meyerson Symphony Center Thursday. Chief among the targets was businessman/former presidential candidate H. Ross Perot, whom Carvey often lampooned when he was a regular on TV’s Saturday Night Live.

Doing a dead-on impression of the dimunitive billionaire, Carvey said Perot showed real promise as a candidate with his, “We’re gonna study it … we’ll get some charts” schtick, before going off the deep end with nonsensical statements like this: “You can’t put a porcupine in a bar and light it on fire and expect it to make licorice!”

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Shopping for Dallas Investors for a Texas-Set Western

With its fast-growing population of wealthy people, Dallas has been a magnet for filmmakers looking for investment cash for awhile. Movies financed by North Texans include the 2008 Ben Stein documentary “Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed,” Rob Allyn’s “Java Heat” starring Mickey Rourke, and several from Gary Cogill’s (now-shuttered) Lascaux Films, a company that was basically bankrolled by local doctors.

The latest moviemaker to come knocking seeking Dallas dough is Chris Ekstein, an award-winning cinematographer from Venice, Calif., who’s shopping a Western project set in Texas called “The Last Duane.” Inspired by the writings of author Zane (“Riders of the Purple Sage”) Grey, the flick’s a straight-up oater about a gunfighter and outlaw who eventually sees the light and “gives himself over to service in the Texas Rangers.”

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