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Dinesh D’Souza Goes to His First NFL Game

Dinesh D’Souza, a Mumbai-reared author and public intellectual who’s been called one of America’s most influential conservative thinkers by The New York Times, had never attended an NFL game—until last night’s pre-season scrap between the Cowboys and the Houston Texans. D’Souza and his fiancee, Debbie Fancher of Houston, were guests in T. Boone Pickens’ Owners Club suite at AT&T Stadium. The energy magnate wasn’t there, but his right-hand man, Jay Rosser, showed the pair all the sights, from the “runway” where the ‘Boys retreat to their locker room at halftime to Jerry Jones’ suite (alas, the door was closed).

So, what was D’Souza’s reaction? “It’s very eye-opening for me,” he said. “I’m looking at it as a spectacle, from the point of view of Americana and American culture. … George Will keeps telling us that baseball is America’s game, but I don’t agree. I think football is America’s game. It embodies steel and masculinity and aggressiveness and speed. To me, baseball is like a poor man’s cricket.” D’Souza, whose film 2016: Obama’s America is the second highest-grossing political documentary ever, added that he’s planning to shoot much of a new doc about the progressive movement and Hillary Clinton in Dallas. Not because DFW is a progressive hotbed, but because “there’s a lot of [moviemaking] talent here.”

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Railroad Commissioner Christi Craddick: Texas Now Leading U.S. Again in Some Oil and Gas Regs

Texas Railroad Commissioner Christi Craddick won’t talk yet about a preliminary report to the commission ruling out a link between earthquakes near Azle and a disposal well operated by XTO Energy—findings that contradicted an earlier study by scientists at SMU, which did find a connection. But during an appearance in Dallas yesterday, Craddick said the commission, which regulates the Texas oil and gas industry, is working with its recently hired staff seismologist to investigate seismic activity and to hold “conversations” with concerned communities.

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Long Day for United Way, Fluor, Dallas Afterschool Puts STEM Education in the Spotlight

Inside the Santa Clara Regional Community Center Education Building in West Dallas, more than 100 local elementary students were quietly interacting yesterday afternoon with 30 volunteers from Fluor Corp., the Irving-based global engineering and construction giant. The purpose of the unusual gathering: to pique the students’ interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education […]

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CEOs Offer Advice for Overcoming Major Business Obstacles

For Gabriella Draney Zielke, the big obstacle was dealing with people. Craig J. Lewis’s was convincing his family and friends to “take the leap of faith” with him to start a business. And Jennifer Sampson overcame hers after hearing from one of the most prominent CEOs in North Texas. These chief executives were among several […]

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Meet the New Fed Boss, Same as the Old Fed Boss?

Age around 60? Check. Steel-grey hair? Check. Wire-rim-type eyeglasses? Check. Background working for a Wall Street investment bank? Check. At first blush Robert Steven Kaplan, just selected as the new president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, seems pretty much like the old president and CEO he’s replacing, Richard Fisher.

While Fisher was known as an “inflation hawk,” though, not that much seems to be known about Kaplan’s views on monetary policy. He’s currently a business professor at Harvard, and previously was vice chairman of the Goldman Sachs Group. (Oh yeah: he’s also on the board of Heidrick & Struggles International, the search firm that was hired to replace Fisher. It’s said he’ll quit the board.)

Assesses Danielle DiMartino Booth, an ex-Fed employee who worked for Fisher as an advisor: “At least on paper, [Kaplan’s] qualifications suggest that he is highly capable of maintaining the Dallas Fed’s reputation as a district that can continue to be global in perspective and incorporate the financial markets into its economic and monetary policy-making framework.”

Anti-Trump Jihad Spills Over to DMN News Pages

Even casual readers of the Dallas Morning News know the paper’s editorial board is freaking out over Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. But now some of that virulent anti-Trump sentiment seems to be leaking over to the news side. In story after story, for example, reporter Sylvan Lane has written that Trump said “most Hispanic immigrants were rapists and criminals.” But, that’s not what Trump said.

In his campaign announcement speech—as CNN’s Anderson Cooper and others have acknowledged—Trump was referring to illegal immigration across the Mexican border when he said: “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending the best. They’re not sending you, they’re sending people that have lots of problems and they’re bringing those problems. They’re bringing drugs, they’re bringing crime. They’re rapists and some, I assume, are good people, but I speak to border guards and they’re telling us what we’re getting.”

Lane ups the anti-Trump ante in a Page One story today, whose first sentence reads: “How do you deal with a bully like Donald Trump?” A photo caption with the story then doubles down on the misquoting, saying Trump has “famously said most Hispanics immigrants were rapists and criminals.” I know the DMN recently laid off at least one of its best veteran political editors, but surely they have somebody on staff who knows a little bit about fairness and accuracy.

Bernie Sanders’ Warning for Billionaires: ‘Your Greed is Destroying America, and We Are Going to End Your Greed!’

They started letting people into the big Sheraton Dallas Hotel ballroom at 11:30 a.m. yesterday, 90 minutes before Bernie Sanders, the independent Vermont senator and Democratic presidential candidate, was scheduled to show up for a campaign rally. Neil Young’s “Rockin’ in the Free World” blared from the sound system as they poured in: a young white guy wearing an Obama t-shirt, a 50ish Hispanic woman in a pink cowboy hat, older Anglo men with long gray ponytails, a middle-aged black woman in a business suit. Among the early-arriving crowd near the makeshift stage was Denton-born Roy Holcomb, a 57-year-old real estate investor who’d come with his daughter Jessie Pike and her husband, David Pike, both 26-year-old Lewisville schoolteachers.

“I’ve been reading Bernie pretty hard for five years,” Holcomb said. “What got me stirred up was Citizens United. Money has just taken over, and he’s the only one calling out the banks, the Koch brothers, the corporations. The corporations do one thing: make money and eat everything in their wake. I’m the cowboy, and the Indians—the Republicans—are all around me, everywhere. My wife is a nut Fox News-hound, and I started watching Fox and thought, ‘This is propaganda.’ ” Holcomb, who said Sanders’ chief rival Hillary Clinton is “bought and paid for by the corporations—just like Jeb Bush,” added with a laugh that he had to talk his daughter and her husband into accompanying him today. Said David, choosing his words carefully: “We’re still trying to figure it out.”

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Scrambling for Face Time With a Writer From The Economist

A few weeks ago, Terrell and Jim Falk hosted a dinner for columnist Adrian Wooldridge of The Economist magazine at their home in Dallas’ Briarwood neighborhood. Many of the 25 or so guests of the Falks—he’s president and CEO of the World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth—were eager to get some face time with Wooldridge, who was gathering material for a column about the North Texas economy.

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D CEO Named Best Regional Business Magazine in U.S.—Again

The Alliance of Area Business Publishers is a national outfit that represents regional and local business magazines and newspapers with a combined circulation of more than 1.2 million. Every year the group puts on an editorial competition that recognizes excellence in journalism, photography, and design. This year the competition drew more than 620 entries, with judging by faculty members from the University of Missouri School of Journalism. Among nine AABP awards for 2015 that D CEO picked up at the group’s conference Saturday night—compared to the seven it won last year and eight in 2013—D‘s business publication was named the best regional business magazine in America, for the third straight year. All the details are over on our business site, D Business Daily.

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D CEO Again Named Best Regional Business Magazine in U.S.

For the third straight year, D CEO was named the country’s best regional business magazine in The Alliance of Area Business Publishers’ annual Editorial Excellence awards. The “gold” or first-place award for Best Magazine was one of D CEO’s nine awards in the annual competition, which honors excellence in journalism, photography, and design. In all […]

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Welcome to ‘Five Flags Over Texas. Plus One We Don’t Really Want to Talk About.’

Given the current move to eliminate all things Confederate, isn’t it just a matter of time before the history rewriters set their sights on Six Flags Over Texas? After all, the flag of the Confederate States of America (1861-1865) is one of six referenced by the theme park name. While the CSA flag is not the “battle flag” that’s under fire these days, even statues and other memorials associated with the Confederacy have become prime targets for eradication recently.

“At one time, the park had a themed section called The Confederacy, and the Confederate Battle Flag was used as part of the theming and a civil war re-enactment,” says Six Flags spokeswoman Sharon Parker. “The name of that section of the park was changed to The Old South in the mid-1990s and all Confederate Battle Flags were removed. Six Flags Over Texas continues to fly the Confederate States of America Flag, but does not fly or sell any variation of the Confederate Battle Flag.”

Chances are, that explanation won’t cut it with the rewrite crowd. So get ready for, “Welcome to ‘Five Flags Over Texas. Plus One We Don’t Really Want To Talk About.’ “

How Dallas Played a Starring Role in Jeb Bush’s ‘Disjointed’ Presidential Campaign

For many months, the main strategy of Republican presidential hopeful Jeb Bush was to pile up so much loot from donors—the initial prediction was for $100 million in 180 days—that potential rivals would run away from the race with their tails between their legs. As a result of the big-money ploy, the thinking went, W’s brother would be seen as the inevitable nominee. (Among Jeb’s local supporters is oil-and-gas billionaire Trevor Rees-Jones, who serves on Bush’s Texas Leadership Committee.) But now, for a variety of reasons, Jeb’s grand plan really hasn’t worked out. And, according to this story in the Washington Post, it all began to unravel inside a Hyatt hotel at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

Ruth, Roger—and an Absent Ebby—Steal the Show at Volunteer Luncheon

For years, philanthropist and civic leader Ruth Altshuler was saying Monday, the motto of residential real estate doyenne Ebby Halliday Acers was “Don’t smoke, don’t drink, and don’t retire.” But now, at the age of 104, the woman best known simply as Ebby has retired. That didn’t keep the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas from honoring her, though, with one of its “Decades of Distinction” awards during a luncheon at the Hilton Anatole yesterday. The award was presented by longtime United Way supporters Altshuler and former Dallas Cowboys quarterback Roger Staubach, a pair that riffed at times like George Burns and Gracie Allen—or Kathy Griffin and Anderson Cooper.

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Banker ‘Chuck’ Gummer Snags Top Award at United Way Volunteer Event

Some of the region’s biggest companies and most iconic business leaders were honored Monday at the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas‘ sixth annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon and Awards Ceremony at the Hilton Anatole hotel in Dallas.

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