Find a back issue

Parsing That Long John Wiley Price Story

As Cristina mentioned in Leading Off, on Sunday the Morning News published a lengthy story about the FBI’s investigation of John Wiley Price. I can’t figure it out. Because almost none of it is new. After the FBI raids in the summer of 2011, the paper did a great job piecing together what the feds were looking for and all the curious financial matters concerning price: the land deals, the bankruptcy, the expensive cars, the cash in the safe. The story we got Sunday is just a rehash of all that, with one small addition:

A recent flurry of new subpoenas in the case makes some attorneys anticipate indictments.

“I haven’t known of this amount of activity since right after the search warrants were issued,” said Tom Mills, a Dallas defense attorney who represents Dapheny Fain, Price’s longtime executive assistant.

Fain is among those accused of participating in a criminal conspiracy with Price.

Mills said that several of Fain’s relatives were interviewed by the FBI and testified before a grand jury in late March. Mills said that he’s been told that other people have also been subpoenaed, but he doesn’t know who.

“Basically, what it means is that they’re going to take some action soon,” Mills said, referring to federal prosecutors. “But if pressed, I couldn’t say what soon is.”

That’s it. Just 125 words of new material in a 2,270-word story. Some people have recently been subpoenaed. One attorney says something might happen soon. Or soonish. Now that is interesting news. But is it worth a front-page Sunday story of that length? No, it’s not.

I heard not long ago from someone in a position to gossip about such matters that this case was about to get moving again in a public way. The only thing I can figure is that folks at the paper are hearing the same thing, and this is how they decided to respond. I don’t know, though. Why publish early, ahead of the news? If you thought something was about to happen, why not get this background material ready and then just put your go bag by the back door? Like I say, I can’t figure it out.

11 comments on “Parsing That Long John Wiley Price Story

  1. Think about it — the DMN has received a reliable enough tip that this is about to break open and they are getting ahead of the game before the indictments and arrests start.

  2. Yes, as I said: “The only thing I can figure is that folks at the paper are hearing the same thing, and this is how they decided to respond. I don’t know, though. Why publish early, ahead of the news?” I don’t see how it helps the paper to regurgitate old news in advance of any indictments and arrests.

  3. People have short memories, so I really don’t see a problem with the DMN’s story anymore than I have a problem with a blog repeatedly linking to a story they wrote. Do you know what did surprise me? There was no hint that the business class – like, members of the big Dallas families – are being subpoenaed or indicted.

  4. I’ve always thought that “shuttlecock” is a funny word and that someone should start a business that takes advantage of that fact. “Need a ride to the airport?” “No. It’s an early flight. I’ll just take Shuttlecock.”

  5. That sounds like a ride to the airport that includes a happy ending.

    You know. Like arriving at the airport.

  6. So, why are you wasting everyone’s time writing a 363 word article to explain how much of a waste of time a competitors article was? I remember my first elementary school book report……..

  7. So, why are you wasting everyone’s time writing a 363 word article to criticize a competitors article, which coincidentally also wasted everyone’s time? I remember my first Elementary School book report Tim………..

  8. This short piece by Tim Rogers acts as a caution sign to an attention-challenged, innuendo-craving public. Regurgitating old news but rephrasing it slightly is is part and parcel of the 24/7 news cycle. Its by-product is the creation of the “authority” or “new voice” – people who do little more than act as circus barkers inciting whatever demographic they wish to ally themselves with.

    As a result, ignorance is celebrated to the point where our legislatures, local and national are overrun with ignorant people whose sole attribute is the ability to convincingly parrot the words and resultant ideologies of people whose goal is to get the socio-politically ignorant majority to vote against its best interests.

    Don’t believe me? Ask Fran Luntz.