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Komen’s Brinker Gets A Raise After PR Fiasco

Last summer, we weren’t the only ones to take Nancy Brinker to task for the infamous Planned Parenthood fiasco. Not because the CEO and founder of Susan G. Komen for the Cure yanked grants from PP, then restored them with a red face; as a private foundation, those are Komen’s decisions to make, screwy as they were.

The problem in our view was that Brinker never ‘fessed up to the real reasons behind the moves, besmirching the nonprofit’s image further with her ham-handed dishonesty.

Well, surprise, surprise. According to business columnist Cheryl Hall at the Dallas Morning News, Brinker has been handsomely rewarded for her ineptness. Cheryl found that Brinker earned nearly $685,000 in fiscal 2012—a whopping increase from her previous year’s salary of $417,000.

That really is nice work, if you can get it.

  • DGirl

    How else is she going to pay for all of that plastic surgery?

  • runDMC

    Komen is a complete scam. Name a single thing they have done for breast cancer research.
    Their expense ratio is one of the worst out there. They have efficiently mobilized the community behind a great cause but those volunteers and donors should be asking, “where’s the money?” $700k apparently is in Nancy’s knickers. For what?

  • Andrea Rader

    This is Andrea Rader, spokeswoman for Komen, and I’ve corrected this with the Dallas Morning News. She last received a pay increase in 2010 that went into effect in 2011. No new raise in 2011. No raise in 2012. Our FY12 financial reports cover the period ending March 31, 2012. That’s where the 2011 increase is reflected. She worked as an unpaid volunteer from Komen from its founding in 1982 until she became CEO in 2009. Her pay is based on executive compensation reports from leading compensation firms, and approved by our Board. She is about mid-range for a nonprofit of our size and scope.

  • Andrea Rader

    This is Andrea Rader, spokeswoman for Komen, and I’ve corrected this with the Dallas Morning News. She last received a pay increase in 2010 that went into effect in 2011. No new raise in 2011. No raise in 2012. Our FY12 financial reports cover the period ending March 31, 2012. That’s where the 2011 increase is reflected. She worked as an unpaid volunteer from Komen from its founding in 1982 until she became CEO in 2009. Her pay is based on executive compensation reports from leading compensation firms, and approved by our Board. She is about mid-range for a nonprofit of our size and scope.

  • Bobtex

    But this response begs the question of WHY Brinker is paid anything more than reimbursement of her expenses. Is this her “reward” for starting a tax-exempt (taxpayer-subsidized) “nonprofit” corporation and building it up into a “big business”? For 27 years she seemed content to work for her organization for no cash compensation. Her work and her motives were admirable. When she changed roles, and began to be paid for her efforts, her downhill slide began, which culminated in her disastrous Planned Parenthood debacle. How can Komen possibly move forward with Brinker hanging on for dear life? She needs to let go, and let Komen try to repair the damage that she caused.

  • J.D.

    I’m afraid Komen has become much like the rest of the medical industry where the money isn’t in the cure, but in the continued treatment of the illness. Why funnel more money into the research when, once a cure is found, the money train for folks like Ms. Brinker and you, Ms. Rader, will no longer exist…?

    If Ms. Brinker was so concerned with keeping her promise to her deceased sister, to end breast cancer once and for all, then perhaps a meager, but comfortable salary would allow more money to flow to research. Instead, she is a ghoul has used her sister’s for her personal fame and gain. It’s sickening and the primary reason I avoid anything associated with Komen.

  • ABjack

    Another reason why I would burn money before donating to Komen.

  • Jackson

    Glenn Hunter is congenitally loathe to take a swipe at the historically Big D rich or powerful. This blog post tells me Nancy is now fair game.

  • elena34

    All I know is that Nancy Brinker has worked like a dog for this cause after the tragic death of her sister. She deserves to be compensated, and those naysayers wouldn’t make such snarky comments if she was male. But of course, women are held to different standards.

    Komen was backed into a corner and they made some unfortunate mistakes. Powerful and competent are targets, and Nancy and Hilary Clinton have a lot in common in that department.

    Too bad they can’t be judged for their hard work and competence.

  • Chris

    what hard work? What has the charity done for the actual research? I can’t find anything they have accomplished.

  • Mavdog

    elena, a very disingenious attempt to turn the discussion into women vs men compensation.

    there is noone disparaging Brinker receiving this absurd salary because she is a women, people are critical because of the amount being paid by a supposedly not for profit to a person who apparently uses the cash flow of the not for profit for their own personal enrichment.

    If Brinker truly strives for reaching the goal of women not from suffering from cancer, this money would not be put into her bank account but rather invested into a lab which does research.

  • Jackson

    @elena34: Your take on what happened re Komen is off-key. They were not “backed into a corner,” as you put it. They backed themselves into that corner, and Nancy then danced on the head of a pin to try and explain it all away. This is the reality regardless of her gender. It’s great that she founded Komen, and that it has raised awareness of breast cancer. That’s what makes the fiasco that unfolded — on her watch, let’s remember — all the more unfortunate.

  • elena34

    You have given me something to think about. Thank you for your informed and civilized comments. I think that I need to have a better understanding of the financial structure of the organization. Keep commenting and I will read.

  • Jessica Fan-Wright

    While Komen is a Top 25 nonprofit in terms of donations and the largest non-profit funder of breast cancer research in the world, Brinker’s compensation is not even CLOSE to these organizations that compare to Komen in size. Pile on Brinker who built the organization for 30 some odd years as a unpaid volunteer before becoming CEO but you don’t questions the folks (MEN) in the list below? It’s just wrong. I’m so sad about Ms. Hall’s blatant spinning of the FACTS that serve no other purpose but to stir people up into hysterics.

    TOP 25 COMPENSATION PACKAGES
    http://www.charitywatch.org/hottopics/Top25.html

    Organization
    Top Salary*
    Peter T. Scardino, M.D., Chairman Attending Surgery, Department of Surgery Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    $2,207,147
    Michael Friedman, M.D., President/CEO City of Hope
    $1,434,148
    Kenneth Guidera, Chief of Staff
    Shriners Hospitals for Children
    $1,374,996
    Includes $939,936 retirement and other deferred compensation.
    Edward J. Benz, Jr., M.D., President/CEO
    Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Jimmy Fund
    $1,245,790
    Brian Mullaney, Past President Smile Train
    $1,178,571
    Edwin J. Feulner, Jr., President Heritage Foundation
    $1,172,321
    Robert J. Beall, President/CEO Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
    $1,073,725
    Brian Gallagher, President/CEO United Way Worldwide
    $999,574
    Harry Johns, President/CEO Alzheimer’s Association – N.O.
    $996,824
    Includes $393,218 retirement and other deferred compensation.
    Robert J. Mazzuca, Past Chief Scout Executive Boy Scouts of America – N.O.
    $987,412
    Wayne LaPierre, CEO & Executive VP/Ex-Officio National Rifle Association & Foundation, respectively
    $972,000
    Christopher DeMuth, Past Senior Fellow American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research
    $925,950
    Includes $500,000 severance and $606,075 supplemental non-qualified retirement plan.
    Greg Bontrager, COO American Cancer Society
    $913,126
    Scott A. Blackmun, CEO United States Olympic Committee
    $902,977
    Steven E. Sanderson, Past President/CEO Wildlife Conservation Society
    $870,642
    William E. Evans, Director/CEO St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/ALSAC
    $863,770
    Jonathan W. Simons, M.D., President/CEO

    Prostate Cancer Foundation
    $845,079
    Nancy A. Brown, CEO American Heart Association
    $843,779
    David Harris, Executive Director American Jewish Committee
    $842,419
    James E. Williams, Jr., President/CEO Easter Seals
    $796,501
    Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein, President International Fellowship of Christians and Jews
    $784,193
    Michael L. Lomax, President/CEO UNCF/The College Fund
    $773,693
    Myra Biblowit, President Breast Cancer Research Foundation
    $753,374
    Rabbi Marvin Hier, President/CEO Simon Wiesenthal Center
    $742,218
    Abraham H. Foxman, National Director/Trustee Anti-Defamation League & Foundation, respectively
    $740,160

  • elena34

    Jessica, many thanks for your informative comments.

  • Harvey Lacey

    Thanks Jessica for putting things into their proper perspective. However, I don’t see this as a male/female comparison as much as it is a indictment of charity businesses.

    It is a business and in business the scorecard is compensation, sports business, entrepreneurship, entertainment, charity, sameo sameo.

  • elena34

    Great point.

  • Dubious Brother

    The good thing about non-profits is that if you don’t like what they do or how they do it you don’t have to give them your money – unless of course they are funded by the government and you don’t have a choice.