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How Barbecue Can Help

I don’t eat meat and haven’t had any since, hmm, let’s see, sometime around 2001? Let’s say that. But I know people are passionate about it. One of them is Cody Neathery from Plano. He describes himself as a “amateur barbecue enthusiast” and shares his thoughts on his (okay, unfortunately named) BBQ Terrorist blog. He’s been a fan of Frisco’s 3 Stacks Smoke and Tap House since it opened. Last week, he heard they were taking a truck and a smoker down to West. He decided to go along.

With every experience or situation we come in contact with, no matter how major or minor, there is always one or two moments that shake you to the bone. One of these moments came in the form of a woman and her children who drove up into our parking lot. She was in the most solemn mood I had seen from any other person that day. As she gave her order of food to one of the helpers, she then tried to pay with a handful of cash. I watched subtly as she tried her best to negotiate payment for the food as the volunteer continued to deter this. And then it happened. The woman begin crying as she had lost a family member and was gracious for the meals provided. Since she was alone with her children only an assumption of who had passed could be made.

Check out the rest of his report.

9 comments on “How Barbecue Can Help

  1. So maybe I’m cranky today, and dude’s heart is probably in the right place, but…

    Czechoslovakian town? Seriously? Dude wants to lecture on the correct names of pastries because he’s an expert, right?

    Not only does Czechoslovakia not exist, it didn’t exist when the vast majority of the European descendents of West (and many other Texas towns) emigrated to America. Ethnic Czechs in Texas used to be called Bohemians (or other, slightly more pejorative versions thereof) because the region in question was called Bohemia until 1918.

    Dude’s writing is so painful to read I couldn’t make it all the way through the post. Maybe somebody could offer up some copy editing services.

    And last, but not least, *lean* brisket? Where was this guy born, Ohio?

  2. Actually, Czechoslovakia was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from October 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until its peaceful dissolution into the Czech Republic and Slovakia on 1 January 1993.

    Those actually are correct names of the pastries. I’m guessing you’ve never done research on much before you post nonsense.

    If they wanted to be called “Bohemians”, then you would see them promote that in West but apparently you can’t read either. Go to West and do your research.

  3. Yeah his heart’s in the right place, so was he. I imagine the people of West appreciate his help more than than they do your invaluable knowledge of their history.
    Marc N.

  4. I don’t think I ever heard even the real old timers, my grandfather and great uncle, for example, call themselves or anyone else Bohemians. Usually just Czech, but honestly, they didn’t even say that. The only name I ever heard really heard them use was Bohunk — and that was if someone was being a jerk or something. It’s … not nice.

  5. Zac, Bohunk is number one on the list of “slightly more pejorative” names I was thinking about. Didn’t really want to put it in the post, but you did so there it is.

    I’m related by marriage to two different sets of Czechs, some of whom live in McLennan County but most of whom live out in West Texas (the area, not the city). I’ve not heard the folks in McLennan County refer to themselves and others as Bohemians that often, but when I was a kid practically everybody out west referred to themselves as Bohemians. Many of the people born in the early 20th century, people who still retained their accents 60-or-so years later, were till alive at the time so that might have made a difference.

    And @AllKnowingTVGuy, you are of course correct that I know nothing about Czechs or Czech heritage. I’ve never eaten nor even seen a Czech pastry. I defer to your superior knowledge.

  6. Just because the kid knows the difference between a Kolache and Klobasnek has nothing to do with his efforts in West. Since you’re so close to the “Czechs” why don’t you shut your mouth and go help out. Maybe someone is slightly jealous? Peace.

  7. John, given the stellar quality of your rebuke(s), the only response that comes to mind is:

    “I fart in your general direction.”