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Should Dog DNA Testing, to Bust Those Who Don’t Scoop Pet Poop, be Mandatory in Dallas?

In the October issue of D Magazine, Krista wrote about the required dog DNA testing at the Ilume apartment complex on Cedar Springs Road. All pet owners who live there must submit to the scheme. Any bit of errant poop left behind by irresponsible owners is tested, and if it matches the DNA of one of the dogs on file, the owner faces a $250 fine.  (This is the same story that sparked criticism about our use of the term “Dog Nazis” on the magazine’s cover.)

Anyway, at yesterday’s Dallas City Council meeting, leaders were pitched the idea of extending the program citywide. The pitch came from the same company that runs the program for Ilume, Poo Prints. According to NBC 5’s report, Councilwoman Angela Hunt likes the idea: “I think we do need enforcement, especially in some of our denser areas where you have a lot of folks living with dogs and, if they’re not picking up. It creates a problem.”

Each dog owner would pay $30 for a DNA sample, and then the city would pay $50 to test the DNA for a match. Poo Prints claims the city could more than recoup the cost with fines. Apparently they’re going to talk about it some more, but there’s no way this becomes a reality, right? Isn’t there some Dog-ACLU that could object? Not to mention the logistical nightmare?

Oh – and I guess I should plug the fact that nominations for our cutest dog in Dallas contest are still being accepted, no DNA sample required.

  • Justin

    Pay $30 dollars out of my own pocket for the privilege of possibly incurring large fines in the future? Yeah, I’ll get right on that. (I actually pickup after my dog though).

  • Stells

    I can’t imagine this working on a citywide basis. First, you have to convince every pet own to pay $30 per dog so the city is able to test. Yeah, okay, sure…except that only adds to the nightmare, because most of the stray poop they’d find, I’d imagine, would be from dogs who aren’t in the database.

    And I don’t even want to think about the legality and logistics of poop found on non-public property (even if it’s a vacant lot).

  • deecue

    So how big does the dog turd have to be to incur the fine? I’ve stepped on itty bitty turds that one can hardly see…what if the dog owner thinks they’ve picked it all up, but a poop PI wants to get rid of every little bitty turd? What about those real runny ones that can disappear with a quick spray of a hose? How does a dog owner pick those up without creating a bigger mess? Even better, provide some incentive to pick the poop up…I know that there are methane capture receptacles that can power a street light….oh yeah, and what are we gonna pay the City owned poop investigators who chase down doggie ne’er-do-wells? How many need to be hired? Seems like another just another weird idea to create more revenue…oh, and, I pick up after my pup too…

  • Joy

    Don’t we have a backlog of unperformed DNA tests on rape kits and other crime evidence? Seems like dog s–t should move to the end of the line.

  • allison

    Where exactly are they going to get the money to pay the Poop Patrol? Are they going to come knock on everyone’s door to swab every dog’s cheek? How often are they going to check on streets- daily, weekly, monthly?

    I would have to think long and hard to find one person I know that actually has their dog registered with the city. If that’s not enforced or even encouraged by the city, what’s the likelihood this is gonna work? Slim to none.

  • Kk.

    I’m sure the thousands of dogs waiting to be rescued in shelters will be thrilled to hear the city is making harder, more complicated and more expensive to get a dog.

  • Paul

    This latest offering is only further evidence of my contention that Dallas is not actually a real city but rather exists solely in the mind of Christopher Guest as a screen treatment undergoing continuous revision.

    If you can produce a Dallas character or issue to disprove this hypothesis, by all means do so.

  • Paul

    This latest offering is only further evidence of my contention that Dallas is not actually a real city but rather exists solely in the mind of Christopher Guest as a screen treatment undergoing continuous revision.

    If you can produce a Dallas character or issue to disprove this hypothesis, by all means do so.

  • Lisa Gonzales

    I lease property and I find that most pet owners do not even know about registering their pets with the city of Dallas or at least they claim not to know. You think they would be willing to pay for a DNA. How hiliraous