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Taking the Treat Out of Trick-or-Treating

The scene’s a quiet, leafy, White Rock Lake-area neighborhood, one home in particular lit up, decked to the nines for Halloween 2012. Throngs of well-mannered, costumed kids with parents troop through as usual for their candy fix. Most tentatively pick out one or two or three pieces off a pile on a big round tray, politely say, “Thank you,” move on.

Then four trick-or-treaters show up, including a tall guy with a moustache who looks 20 but says he’s 12. The four pounce on the offered candy, driving the tray into the driveway gravel as they pick it clean. Walking away, one of them swipes a battery-powered “zombie hand” that flashes on and off, part of the home’s holiday decor for a dozen years.

A couple of groups later, a young boy accompanying four cheerful girls looks sullen. The girls explain that, a little earlier, the aforementioned “12-year-old with a moustache” had hauled off and slugged their friend in the jaw, and he’s embarrassed and angry.

This little Halloween tale involves three ethnic groups, and it doesn’t matter which group did what to whom. But it leaves one party feeling it can raise hell with impunity, and two others smoldering and resentful. The neighborhood turns off the lights early.

12 comments on “Taking the Treat Out of Trick-or-Treating

  1. So some teenagers acted like jerks and you think it’s a racial issue? Have you never met teenagers before?

  2. A dimly lit porch. A squeaky screen door. A silver-maned oldster stands shaking his fist as the children scatter, laughing. I won’t disclose his ethnicity. It doesn’t matter.

  3. “So some teenagers acted like jerks ” so hitting another child in the face with a fist is acting like a jerk?

  4. I didn’t imply that hitting people was acceptable behavior, but it’s not acceptable behavior no matter the race of the person doing the punching or the person being punched. And yes, I would say punching people qualifies you as a jerk and depending on the situation more than a jerk.

  5. All kinds of fun in White Rock last night, it seems. Turned the porch light off, figuring who needs to hear the dog go ballistic every three minutes. But then I relented. First group was about 15 little kids and a girl around 18. While my hands were busy holding the candy and putting it in the little kids buckets, the 18 year old started grabbing handfuls of candy, all the while death-staring me straight in the face. Grabbed about seven handfuls before I realized all candy was gone.

    Out went the porch light. Good times.

  6. Um, Glenn, I fail to see why the ethnic groups are a throw away line in this story unless you are trying to say something. Have you and your “Fortune Cookie” not learned your lesson about writing racially charged blog posts?

  7. I had over 70 trick or treaters from little ones to some teens. All were well-mannered, said “Trick or Treat” and said thank you. Putting the candy in their buckets,bags solves the problem of greed.

    Great costumes and I had a great time.

  8. You need to learn better shame techniques. I like to take out my phone and take pictures: 1. because its cute when you get a picture of an infant in an elephant costume, but its evidence when done to a teenager that might retaliate and its also a good time to remind them that you indeed know how to post videos to Facebook. 2. If you provide free access to the bowl, you share in the blame. That’s like putting cash in a bucket and saying just take a penney; and 3. you should have thanked him for his kindness and generosity by participating in Movember.

    Now get off my lawn.

  9. Engaging post, Glenn. Could use a little tightening. Following, find my draft:

    Caucasians and Asians in one leafy White Rock-area neighborhood are smoldering and resentful of Mexicans. Then one of them stole all my candy and another hauled off and punched a kid. Which just goes to prove we were right all along.

    I think you’ll agree it’s punchier and far, far more to the point.