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Foreign Policy Lists Dallas Among World’s 75 Most Dynamic Cities

Why is it that, even when paying Dallas a compliment (as with Foreign Policy ranking the city as the 23rd most dynamic in the world, expected to be among the most important places on the globe in 2025), magazines can’t resist falling back on the old-standbys:

The capital of big hair and big oil, sports-crazed Dallas holds the distinction of being the only U.S. city to have hosted the World Series, the NBA finals, and the Super Bowl in the same year. Jerry Jones, the megalomaniacal owner of the Dallas Cowboys, has left an indelible mark on the city, constructing a $1.15 billion stadium for America’s Team that serves as a landmark to American bigness. The site of the first Neiman Marcus department store, Dallas has also proved itself to be an economic dynamo, cradling a booming energy industry and a slew of tech companies that led the city to be known during the 1980s as the “Silicon Prairie.” Still, to many people around the world, Dallas may be best known for the schmaltzy 1980s soap opera — in addition to the unimaginative 2012 remake — that unfathomably became a global hit at the height of the Cold War.

To add insult to injury, Dallas finished one spot behind Houston. Shouldn’t be surprised, I suppose, since Houston is the coolest city in the U.S. Otherwise, Dallas is the fourth American city on the list, trailing only Houston, New York, and Los Angeles.

Read the whole ranking , and you may find yourself feeling a need to learn to speak Chinese.

5 comments on “Foreign Policy Lists Dallas Among World’s 75 Most Dynamic Cities

  1. I guess I’d rather Dallas be known for big hair, big oil, big sports and cowboys instead of JFK. At least that isn’t mentioned.

  2. Remember when the writer of an article like this would have actually visited the cities before ranking them? I’ve never heard the term “Silicone Prairie” but thankful they didn’t mention the “Silicone Sisters.”

  3. Significantly, they never define what “dynamic” is supposed to entail — at least not in that website ranking — other than being “an up-and-coming commercial hub.” But if it’s a purely business metric, what have ‘big hair’ or the TV soap have to do with a city’s ranking?

  4. So when do the Fort Worth whiners show up to complain that Jerryworld isn’t even in Dallas County? Oh.. Wait… There I am.