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Paul Goldberger Is Hot

Goldberger is totally going to put that pic on Twitter.
Goldberger is totally going to put that pic on Twitter.

Right now over at the Nasher, they’re wrapping up UTA’s David Dillon Symposium. I didn’t get to attend as much of the two-day affair as I’d like to have, but this afternoon’s “Criticism Today” talk was time well spent. During a break in the action, a few of us stepped outside and into the garden so that the visiting dignitaries could see with their own eyes the glare coming off Museum Tower. Paul Goldberger, the Pulitzer-winning architecture critic who just left The New Yorker to join Vanity Fair, was mightily impressed by the tower’s power to reflect heat and light. Looking up at it through his dark sunglasses, he said, “That looks like Sauron’s Dark Tower in Mordor, from Lord of the Rings.”

Actually, that’s a lie. Goldberger didn’t say that. That’s what our creative director, Todd Johnson, said when we were working on cover lines for our story about Museum Tower. But if Goldberger were as big a sci-fi dork as our creative director, he could have said that.

6 comments on “Paul Goldberger Is Hot

  1. You must take the ring deep into the heart of Mordor and cast it back into the fires of Klyde Warren Park from whence it came…

  2. Really enjoyed the article on the new Museum Tower and it blew me away. I am a Nasher lover, consider it one of the best reasons to live in Dallas. The last several times that I visited the gardens I too gazed up at the tower concerned how it’s presence effected the Nasher, but I never imagined the heat. I am curious to know about the exhibit in the garden that has been closed off the last two times that I’ve visited, is it due to the tower? I’m referring to the white room (that’s what I call it).

  3. @Amanda: You’re referring to the Turrell piece called Tending, (Blue). And your hunch is correct. It is closed because Museum Tower has ruined its view of the sky. Most likely the room will have to be dismantled.

  4. While various experts figure out what to do about The Glare — I’m pessimistic they’ll come up with anything very satisfactory, much less elegant — why not turn the problem over to a real expert? Declare a competition among artists for a work that exploits the reflected light, transforming it into a work of environmental art.

  5. Sandblast the west glass of the Museum Tower. Sandblasting the glass should remove the glare and the tenants won’t have the West sun blazing into their space ruining their art. They will not have to look at the hole in the Terrell exhibit anymore also