How the EPA Lost a Big Battle in Texas

A few weeks ago I mentioned the fact that the EPA had settled what looked like a landmark case with the fracking industry in Texas, a case involving a Parker County man who could shoot fire from his garden hose. At the time, it sounded like there was probably a lot more to the story. Well, the Dallas Observer‘s cover story this week, “Fire in the Hole,” gets at the rest of the story. Spoiler alert: fans of the EPA will not be pleased.

7 comments on “How the EPA Lost a Big Battle in Texas

  1. Nope, you’re wrong. The DO’s coverage is a lot better than almost everything that preceded it and actually explains some of the legal BS that was going on. Read this account by someone who was there:
    http://www.texassharon.com/2012/04/26/better-reporting-on-range-resources-water-contamination-case-in-parker-county/…. and for the reason the EPA had to fold the way it did, please see this post:
    http://www.texassharon.com/2012/04/13/are-you-ready-for-the-truth-about-epa-versus-range-resources-in-parker-county-water-contamination-case/. In writing about these issues, it’s really better if journalists speak directly to the citizens involved.

  2. Did you even read the story “Fire in the Hole?” I’m just wondering because your “Spoiler alert” does not match the conclusion in the story.

  3. You can always count on D Magazine supporting the white and wealthy. Heaven forbid you actually read the story and do investigative journalism. Fracking is dangerous business and has no business in urban areas.

  4. These comments are pretty confusing. What exactly do you think I’m wrong about? And how did race get into this?

    I have read the story. Have you? I’m a fan of the EPA (that is, I’m in favor of clean air and water, and an agency looking out for the public interest) and I was pretty disappointed with this case. As I see it, the EPA was outgunned and outmatched here, and gave the agency’s detractors (as I’m sure you know, there are plenty of people who would love to see the EPA disappear forever) some serious meat. I worry about the dangers of fracking, which is why I know the EPA will now have an even more difficult time convincing anyone the next time it steps in somewhere — if there is a next time.

  5. And just how did you think you were going to get away with a post on the EPA/fracking without Race coming up?