Front Page of Last Saturday’s Houston Chronicle

The caption below this incredible photo by Johnny Hanson read:

Waves generated by the outer bands of Hurricane Ike crash into the Galveston Seawall on Friday afternoon, reaching over the memorial to the Great Storm of 1900 that killed as many as 8,000 people on the island. The unnamed hurricane slammed into Galveston on Saturday, Sept. 8, 1900, and remains the deadliest natural disaster in U.S. history.

The powerful — and poignant — combination of headline and design reminds us of what only a newspaper can do. (h/t: Obsidian Wings)

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8 comments on “Front Page of Last Saturday’s Houston Chronicle

  1. I agree that it is a great image and a dramatic use of newspaper layout. But I would be curious to know how many of the newspapers were actually printed and delivered to subscribers on Saturday. Which kind of points out one of the drawbacks of newspapers, in my opinion.

  2. Actually – I have been following it all, I think the newspapers (Galveston and Houston) were the lifeline and valuable source of information. The Galveston newspaper has been up to date online for people displaced from their homes. They consistently had more news than any other source either from the mayor or their blogs (some were reporters updating hourly.)

  3. e – You point to what I was trying to say about the drawbacks of carbon-based newspapers. It’s the electronic versions (including blogs, etc.) that people are reading in fast-changing situations (unless, of course, they don’t have electricity or Internet access). Now the question is, how does e-news make enough money to staff and maintain a presence that can cover the real news?

  4. When the power goes out and you can’t get your news online, you can still pick up the paper and read it. “Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat…” doesn’t just apply to the mail.